The Worldmusic Blog (Seckou Kouyate)

WorldBeatUK (31st Show) - Broadcast Notes (19/10/11)

Tagged with: WorldBeatUK Glyn Phillips Chico Buarque Memphis Minnie Oscar Ibaņez Anxo Lorenzo Carla Pires Lou Dalfin Mauro Palmas Jackson do Pandeiro Paralamas Flavia Bittencourt Dumyarea E-Coli Sivuca Calle 13 dunkelbunt Neblina Blue King Brown Hot 8 Brass Caruaru

 WBUK31 (19th October 2011) - SHOWNOTES

1 “Intro-Mat” by Matchatcha from the album “Nyekesse” (Melodie)

"You’re tuned into Rhubarb Radio and my name’s Glyn Phillips.   [PAUSE]   You’re listening to WorldBeatUK, the show that plays you the stuff that mainstream radio doesn’t even know exists.  

Coming up on the show tonight we focus on Brazil ahead of this Friday’s Amazonas Groove night here in Birmingham, with forro - old and new, bossa nova, samba, batucada, pifano and ska brasileiro.  

I shall bring you electroswing from Cab Calloway and the Andrew Sisters via Wales, Urban Roots music from Melbourne, Australia and Folk Punk Jazz from the Occitan-speaking valleys of North-West Italy.


There’ll also be an Ivory Lady, a Little Fish, and a Wayward Rooster.  Bagpipe music from Galicia, Fado from Portugal, Folk Rock from the island of Sardinia, and Gbema music from Liberia!

And if that wasn’t enough, I’ve got more remixes, refixes, re-rubs and mashups than you shake a glue stick at!  

If you want to know the connection between New York’s Beastie Boys, Denmark’s Analogick, Jamaica’s Bob Marley and Virginia’s Missy Elliott then you’d better stick around!

Throw in some funky New Orleans BrassHop, plenty of Balkanic fusions from Utrecht, Vienna, Rouen and Exeter, a killer mix of Puerto Rican rap and samba and some 1930s blues -  we’ve got a show."

And straight in with the Brazilian theme to the night with this classic from the carioca singer, guitarist, composer, dramatist, poet and writer: Francisco Buarque de Hollanda - better known as Chico Buarque - one of the great names of the MPB genre.  This is called “Essa Moça ‘Ta Diferente”.  Bliss!

2 “Essa Moça 'Ta Diferente” by Chico Buarque

Now Chico Buarque was born into a very privileged family, unlike my next artist. 

Memphis Minnie had it tough from an early age and supported herself from about 12 years old onwards.  But they both made good music. 

I played her rather playful song about her butcher man last week and this week she asks us: If you see my rooster, please run him home! 

And I don’t think she’s talking about the feathered variety either!

3 “If You See My Rooster (Please Run Him Home)” by Memphis Minnie from the album “Hoodoo Lady: 1933-1937” (Sony)

That was Memphis Minnie from the album “Hoodoo Lady:1933-1937” on the Sony label.  


Let’s stay in the America of a bygone era now, but leap ahead a decade. 

This is the great Cab Calloway and the Andrews Sisters showing us how they be “Doin’ The Rhumba”.

But with the twist that Cardiff’s electroswing don Ecklectic Mick has given a little electronic polish to make it shine!



4 “Doin’ The Rumba” (Ecklectic Mick remix) by Cab Calloway/Andrews Sisters



5 “Segura Ele” by Oscar Ibañez (Zouma)

That last track was entitled “Segura Ele” by the Galician bagpiper Oscar Ibáñez and his band. 

I’m not sure whether that’s from his own album or not - since it was on a compilation sampler from his record label Zouma.  

And also on that label and also from that same Celtic corner of North-West Spain, Galicia, comes the next artist - also a bagpiper. 

This is Anxo Lorenzo and from his album “Tiran” a track entitled “The Ivory Lady”.

6 “Ivory Lady” by Anxo Lorenzo from the album “Tiran” (Zouma)

I’m a real sucker for the music of the Iberian peninsula and some of its lesser known musical offerings.  It’s not all flamenco folks! 

Galicia, might be technically in Spain, but its language, Galego, is closer to Portuguese than Castilian Spanish.  

So for the next number we’re heading south into Portugal, the birthplace and home of that most wonderful and romantic of musical styles, Fado

This week it’s the turn of a lady by the name of Carla Pires.  From her 2005 album “Ilha Do Meu Fado” (Island of my Fado) on the Ocarina label, this is “Boca da Note” (the Mouth of the Night).

7 “Boca Da Note” by Carla Pires from the album “Ilha Do Meu Fado” (Ocarina 2005)

Wasn’t that beautiful!  

Europe’s a funny old place.  Layer upon layer of different cultures, ethnicities and languages and constantly shifting borders and power politics. 

There’s a temptation to make sense of all this by easy labelling and pigeon-holing, but as we’ve seen in Spain there are other languages and cultures besides Castilian Spanish (Galego, Catalán and Euskadi to name but three).  

Even France has a huge North-South divide - true French really only derives from the Northern part where the Franks came from; for the fiercely proud southerners there is the language Occitan which spreads from the Atlantic coast near Bordeaux all the way South to the Pyrenees into Spain and across to the Mediterranean Coast and the Alps into Italy.  And it’s from these valleys in the Southern Alps of Italy that the next band come.  

Lou Dalfin was founded in 1982 by the hurdy-gurdy player Sergio Berardo and since then has been a bulwark in promoting the occitan language and it’s Eastern dialect. 

So the next two tracks are from their 2008 album “Virasolelhs” (which means Sunflowers in English - literally “Sun Turners”). 

The first is a 45 second interlude in English bizarrely called “Little Fish” and the second their irreverent mix of folk, jazz and punk in “Occitania e Basta”.  Enjoy!

8 “Little Fish” by Lou Dalfin from the album “’Virasolelhs” (Felmay 2008)


9 “Occitania e Basta” by Lou Dalfin from the album “‘Virasolelhs” (Felmay 2008)

A double-bill there from Italian Occitan flagbearers, Lou Dalfin.

Staying in the Mediterranean area but coming out of the Alps, heading for the coast, and sailing due south past the French-influenced island of Corsica we head toward the mysterious island of Sardinia.

An island with links both to France and especially Italy throughout it’s long history and a fiercesome reputation as a haven for pirates and brigands and savage independence, Sardinia has long kept its folklore to itself.  

More recently it’s been actively promoting its output around the world.  This next track is from the guitarist/singer Mauro Palmas and is from his 2005 album “Caina” on the S’ard Music label.  This piece is called “Oltre Il Mare”.

10 “Oltre Il Mare” by Mauro Palmas from the album “Caina” (S’ardmusic 2005)

OK, we’re going to leave Europe far behind for the next few numbers. 

At the top of the show I said that I’ve got a focus on Brazil going on in the show today and this is because I’m trying to flag up a new night taking place this Friday (21st October) at Birmingham’s very own Brazilian churrascaria restaurant, Amazon Brazil, on 197 Broad St, Birmingham (just down from the UGC Cinema).  

The night called “Amazonas Groove” will feature some great Brazilian dance music of all styles and periods with samba pagode, samba de roda, carimbo, MPB, Afoxe and lashings of forró.  It features DJs Zuppa Inglese, Ricardo and El Hombre Elastico on the decks, starts at 10pm and allegedly goes on till 4am and is only £5 for all that groove!

So here’s some classic forró music from the North-East of Brazil to get us going.  This is Jackson do Pandeiro (from a 1991 compilation album called “Brazil Classics 3: Forró” on the Luaka Bop label and an old track entitled “Tum-Tum-Tum”.

11 “Tum-Tum-Tum” by Jackson Do Pandeiro from the album “Brazil Classics 3: Forró” (Luaka Bop 1991)

Now, during my years in South America in the 1980s I travelled the length and breadth of Brazil taking in the different styles of music in this vast country. 

However I was surprised to find that the country looked as much to the outside world for inspiration.

I don’t know why I was surprised, thinking about it now, but at the time it seemed strange hearing styles that I was familiar with infused with that peculiarly Brazilian flavour that defies description. 

Here’s a good example - I loved this band at the time and played the cassette to death for years afterwards, and it still gets me going now. 

This is the legendary Rio rock band Os Paralamas do Suceso and from their 1984 album “O Passo Do Lui” a piece of punky brazilian ska entitled “Meu Erro”.

12 “Meu Erro” by Os Paralamas do Suceso from the album “O Passo Do Lui

Yep, still gets me rocking after all these years! 

And now to one of the more defining sounds of Brazil - particularly Rio de JaneiroSamba Batucada.  This is a piece of pure percussion in the batucada style. 

The band is Os Reis do Batuque (The Kings of Drumming), the album released in 1977 is entitled “Batucada No 4” and this track is “Repicando”.

13 “Repicando” by Os Reis do Batuque from the album “Batucada No 4” (Philips)

Ha ha ! Yeah, Os Reis do Batuque.  And trust me that was one of the most influential albums on early British Samba schools - we  all used to listen like mad to each track trying to pick apart the rhythms, work out the techniques used and memorise the breaks.  

OK, let’s move ahead over 30 years and to a particular favourite of mine Brazilian singer, Flavia Bittencourt who I had the pleasure of interviewing on this very show a few weeks ago. 

Flavia is originally from the State of Maranhão in the far North East of Brazil, but now lives in Rio.

She contacted me last week and sent me a couple more of her tracks over. 

So this one is a track I saw her perform here in Birmingham a couple of times. 

It’s a rocky forró called “Parangolé Bounce”.

14 “Parangolé Bounce” by Flavia Bittencourt

Lovely, thanks for that Flavia. 

How’s about some very traditional nordestina music now?  Here’s a band formed way back in 1924 (yes, that’s what I said) and who only recorded their first album in 1972 when they went all the way down to Rio!  The album was called “Zabumba Caruarú” and is as fresh today as it was then. 

The band is called Banda de Pífanos de Caruarú and play in a very traditional formation that not only includes the zabumba drum and triangle (found in forró music) but also clashed cymbals, rattling tarol snare and several flutes known as pífanos

This track is the shoulder-shaking, butt-wriggling, full-steam ahead express train that is “Cavalinho Cavalão” - take a listen and you’ll see what I mean.  I defy anyone to sit still during this!

15 “Cavalinho Cavalão” by Banda de Pífanos de Caruarú


[Don’t forget you’re listening to . . .]

Now, I’m going to take a break from Brazil for the moment - but we’ll be returning there in a few tracks’ time.  

This next track comes from Liberia in West Africa and has been heard all over that country this Summer - probably the most played track of all.  The artists are Junior Freeman and African Soldier and it’s being released outside of Liberia by the Ghana-based record label Akwaaba Music. 

 The story behind it is worth telling.  The track is performed in a style known as Gbema - where traditional Liberian music is taken and - as someone described - is put through a “digital sieve”.  At the same time there is a musical renaissance growing throughout Liberia and a whole generation of young urban-dwellers are creating new forms of music and speech, including the hip-hop influenced genre of Hipco

Liberia’s language is English, but stems from its history as a nation artificially carved out of a part of West Africa to take newly freed African-American slaves and repatriate them in an attempt to make amends for displacing them in the first place.  I suppose a little like what happened in Europe with the Jews and the creation of modern Israel.  

The name itself stems from ‘Liberation’, so I suppose the country means “Freedom”.  Sadly, Liberia has suffered severely with a dreadful civil war for years - freedom is one thing, quality of life is another.  

This catchy, upbeat tune is actually quite political in nature and Junior Freeman takes the market-place phrase “Dumyarea” (This is my area) and speaks to the masses of staking their own place within this battered country. 

The phrase and concept became so popular that even the President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf used the song to launch her re-election campaign.  She is the first and only female president in Africa and also the joint winner of the 2011 Nobel Peace Prize.  

So, here you go, from the “Lone Stars Vol. 1: Hipco & Gbema” album on  the Akwaaba Music label, this is Junior Freeman and African Soldier and the track “Dumyarea”

(1) 16 “Dumyarea” by Junior Freeman & African Soldier from the album “Lone Stars Vol. 1: Hipco & Gbema” (Akwaaba Music)


(2) 17 “Amen Gypsy” by E-Coli

Ha ha! Complete change of style and pace there! 

That was some heavy Balkanic dubstep courtesy of DJ and mixer, E-Coli, all the way from Exeter in Devon! 

Bet you didn’t see that one coming did you!



Ok, back to Brazil now and some old school forró followed by some very jazzy forró

First up is the very hard to track down David Cruz and a track entitled “O Corpo Precisa de Alcóol” (the body needs alcohol)! 

Ok if you say so, David...

(3) 18 “O Corpo Precisa de Alcóol” by David Cruz


(4) 19 “Forro” by Sivuca from the album “Brasil” (Soul Jazz Records 1994)

You just heard one of my all-time favourite Brazilian tracks. 

A track entitled simply “Forró” from a 1994 album entitled simply “Brasil” on Soul Jazz Records - delivered with breathtaking skill, energy and panache by the legendary accordionist Sivuca

I’ve been DJing with that one for years and long shall I continue to - absolutely love it!  



The last now in the Brazilian focus on the show, although in fact this is a mashup between Puerto Rico and Brazil

Take the latter’s Erasmo Carlos and the former’s Calle 13 - two young rappers and reggaetoneros with a huge pan-latino following all over latin america extending from street-level latinos through musical and political champions like Rubén Blades right up to Fidel Castro and Hugo Chavez (these guys have made an impression on all of them) - and then let it all be mashed up by one of my favourite mixers, the carioca, DJ LK and this is what you get “Samba de los Aburridos”. 

I love it!

(5) 20 “Samba de los Aburridos” (DJ LK mashup) by Calle 13 vs Erasmo Carlos


(6) 21 “Alive Gipsy” (DJ Magyar) by Beastie Boys vs. Analogik ft. Dunkelbunt

That was another mashup - this time cooked up by DJ Magyar from Utrecht.

Featuring Danish jazzy-balkanists Analogik’s “Gipsy Doodle”, New York’s much sampled rappers The Beastie Boys, Vienna’s Ulf Lindeman aka [dunkelbunt] and of course Helen, Roy and Roy at the beginning.

Did you slip off your shoes and run on the spot?   

More mad mashups now. 

This one’s The Beastie Boys again but this time they run up against Bob Marley in Barcelona-based mashers and mixers Neblina Sound’s track “Triple Chatterbox” from the album “Recycled Mashups Vol 1”

Do you want to know ‘the Real Deal about the Three’?


(7) 22 “Beastie Boys vs Bob Marley - Triple Chatterbox” by Neblina Sound from the album “Recycled Mashups Vol. 1” (Neblina Sounds)


Ok, let’s whizz right round the world now all the way to Melbourne in Australia and one of Oz’s most celebrated world music bands: Blue King Brown

Really like these guys. 

They’re releasing a new album soon, but this one is from their 2006 album “Stand-Up” on Roots Level Records and it’s called simply “Water”

Trust me this is a monster tune! 

Time to get bouncing in your chairs again!

(8) 23 “Water” by Blue King Brown from the album “Stand-Up” (Roots Level Records, 2006)

Fantastic, Australia’s Blue King Brown there.  

Fancy some balkan madness? 

Here you go then. 

This is the balkanesque band Flex’Orkestar from Normandy in Northern France and a piece remixed by Rouen’s M’siou Rigolitch, who I’m a big fan of, entitled “Hora de la Bucuresti”. 

Hold on to your hats guys - here we go!

(9) 24 “Hora de la Bucuresti” by M'siou Rigolitch VS Flex'Orkestar

That’s enough to shake your cobwebs out! 

Let’s get it on - I think it’s time for Virginia’s Missy Elliott and Belgium’s Typsy Gypsy of the Balkan Hotsteppers to get their freak on, dub styleeeeeeee!

(10) 25 “Get Your Freak On” (Typsy Gypsy Remix) by Missy Elliot


(11) 26 “Sandman Jamming” (DJ LK mashup) by Metallica vs Bob Marley

Bet you didn’t see that one coming. 

Rio’s DJ LK and his unlikely mashup between the king of reggae Bob Marley and California’s heavy metal royalty, Metallica in “Sandman Jamming”. 

OK, time to go now.

[Shoutouts, reminders - Amazonas Groove, Leeanne etc at the Edge, I WON’T be here NEXT week -so it’ll be  pre-recorded show.  Off to Womex see you all in a fortnight, etc]

This next track is a remix.  What do you get if you merge the Looney Tunes Brass Band with the High Steppers Brass Band

The Hot 8 Brass Band of course! 

These guys from New Orleans blend hip-hop, jazz and funk alongside traditional Crescent City brass traditions. 

They’re signed to the UK’s Tru Thoughts label (alongside Quantic) and are the label’s only American signing. 

They also appeared in Spike Lee’s  2006 documentary about the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina “When The Levees Broke”.  

This is East London’s Henry Orchard’s house remix of the Hot 8s version of Marvin Gaye’s “Sexual Healing”! 

Still with me?  Don’t worry, just enjoy it! 

See you all in a fortnight!
(12) 27 “Sexual Healing” (Post Toby Mix) by Hot 8 Brass Band (Henry Orchard remix)