The Worldmusic Blog (Seckou Kouyate)

WorldBeatUK (23rd Show) - Broadcast Notes (3/8/11)

Tagged with: WorldBeatUK Glyn Phillips Hossam Ramzy Samba Toure Toland Tchakounte Julaba Kunda Juldeh Camara Griselda Sanderson Hansi Hamilton Loomis Stratton Doyle Mary Anne Kennedy Maria de Fatima Julya Lo'ko Joanne Vance Dub Colossus Magic Tombolinos Ebo Taylor

 WBUK23 (3/8/11) - SHOWNOTES

1 “Intro-Mat” by (1:47) Matchatcha from the album “Nyekesse “ (Melodie)

Welcome to WorldBeatUK on Rhubarb Radio. My name’s Glyn Phillips and over the next two hours we’re going around the world in Weighty Grooves!

We’ve got: Afrobeat from Ghana, Cumbia and Gaita from Colombia, Latin Funk from Miami and Latin Rock from Ecuador.

You’ll also hear some Dub from Ethiopia, some cumbia and gaita from Colombia and some Gaelic folk-song from the Isle of Skye.

Lined up for you I’ve also got Texan Blues, Malian Blues, Mississippi Blues, Fulani Blues and Cameroonian Blues.

Devon-based Scottish-Gambian fiddlers Julaba Kunda give us advice on cattle-herding and also pen a song the Scottish Tourist Board would be proud of.

and from Amsterdam there’s Balkanic Klezmer, Portuguese Fado and Indonesian Fado . . .

I’m going to start the show off with a track from an album called “Rock The Tabla” (on the ARC Music label) that turned up on my desk last week by the world-famous Egyptian percussionist Hossam Ramzy.

If you’ve ever heard any Egyptian music there’s a huge chance that Hossam Ramzy is on it somewhere. If any producer or musician or composer wants any North African or Middle Eastern percussion putting on a tune or film soundtrack, then Hossam Ramzy is usually the first stop.

On this album though, Hossam has assembled some great percussionists and other musicians from his amongst his extensive back catalogue of worldclass artists he’s recorded for.

I got very excited when I saw names like Billy Cobham, A .R. Rahman, Manu Katché and Joji Hirota, who I thought would all be performing in some kind of supergroup.

Not quite. Hossam has recorded separate tracks with each of the main collaborators, which makes for an unbalanced album overall.

Incidentally, the name ‘tabla’ in the context of the album title refers not to the famous paired tabla drums of the Indian sub-continent but to the Egyptian tabla - which is a single-skinned goblet shaped drum elsewhere referred to as darbuka, doumbek etc).

This is just the first of many albums he plans to do like this, so without further ado I’m going to kick the show off with the opening track from this album. This is “Arabantana”.

2 “Arabantana” by (5:07) Hossam Ramzy from the album “Rock The Tabla” (ARC Music)

I’ve got quite a bluesy feel to the first part of the show this evening as I explore the musical connections between Africa, America and Europe. First of all this is a track from the 2011 album “Crocodile Blues” by the Malian guitarist Samba Touré.

Now although - to the best of my knowledge - Samba Touré is not related to the late Malian guitar master Ali Farka Toure, he does have quite a connection with Ali and his legacy. His mother used to sing with Ali many, many years ago and Samba was smitten by his groundbreaking transposition of traditional music onto guitar and taught himself to play in that new style also.

Samba was finally offered the chance to tour Europe and the USA with Ali at the end of the 90s and upon his return he formed his own band, Fondo, with whom he recorded two records for Malian distribution.

In 2010 Samba was invited by none other than Toumani Diabate to play Ali’s parts on the posthumous “Ali Farka Touré Variations Tour”. He’s been picked up by the World Music Network label and they are releasing his new album “Crocodile Blues”. This is off that and is entitled “Alabina”.

3 “Alabina” by (4:15) Samba Touré from the album “Crocodile Blues”

Roland Tchakounté, originally from Cameroon, but now resident in Paris, takes his influence from the classic American blues musicians such as John Lee Hooker and reinterprets the blues in his own way including singing in his native language Bamileke.

Tchakounte delivered a masterclass in blues guitar and stagecraft a few days ago at the Womad festival photos of which should hopefully be up on the world music website: www.worldmusic.co.uk.

This is the title track from Roland Tchakounté’s album “Blues Menessen”.

4 “Blues Menessen” by (4:50) Roland Tchakounté from the album “Blues Menessen” (Tupelo Productions)

Yeah some down-home Parisian-Cameroonian blues from Roland Tchakounté there.

Now, this next track offers us a very interesting perspective into looking at the links between Africa and Europe, links which would eventually form the blues many thousands of miles and a hundred years or more ago across the over side of the pond in America.

Regular listeners to my show will have heard me play music before by the Gambian ritti and kologo player and singer/composer Juldeh Camara - who usually is to be found next to Robert Plant’s buddy Justin Adams in the band JuJu.

However, a few weeks ago I was lucky enough to see Juldeh in a different context altogether - playing alongside a fellow fiddler at the acoustic based HOME Festival in Dartington, Devon.

This, though, was no African or American fiddler, but a Scottish fiddler from a traditional Scottish fiddling family, the lovely Griselda Sanderson. Although they come from fiddling cultures separated by three thousand miles, when they met at Dartington for the first time a few years ago, they felt an instant connection to each other’s music and traditions and so started trading ideas.

Juldeh plays the riti (also known as a nyaneru) - a fiddle made from half a gourd with but one string and no fretboard at all - the notes being made by wrapping his fingers and thumb along the stretched string.

Griselda besides playing the traditional European fiddle is also one of the few people in the UK to play the strange key-operated Swedish nyckelharpa fiddle.

The duo they formed is called Julaba Kunda which is in the Fulani language and translates as “Trading Company”. This track is from their brand-new, hot off the press album “Traders” and is a track entitled “Gainako” with Griselda on nyckelharpa, viola, violin and percussion and Juldeh on vocals and kologo (a two string plucked instrument a bit like a guitar or banjo). The song is all about cattleherding - an activity once of crucial importance in Scotland and still a lifeline in West Africa.

5 “Gainako” by (6:08) Julaba Kunda from the album “Traders” (Waulk Music)

[---CONTINUOUS---]

6 “Homework (Hansi's Fancy Hunk Edit)” by (5:57) John Lee Hooker [Hansi Remix]

You just heard Hansi remix of John Lee Hooker’s “Homework” a salutary tale of not attending to your lady’s ‘needs’(!), and before that the beautiful sound of the Caledo-Gambian duo Julaba Kunda.

OK, We’ve got one more tune in this section that deals with the African-American-European triangle of the Blues.

This is a band that I saw at the Adam & Eve, round the corner from the Rhubarb Radio studio in Digbeth, Birmingham, England, a few months ago playing an unadvertised and completely impromptu gig on their night off from touring! You can’t keep a good musician down!

Hamilton Loomis is a Texan blues guitarist, writer and bandleader (and protege of the late Bo Diddley) who with his sax player Stratton Doyle can produce a sound equivalent to an entire orchestra. When I saw him he was backed by Brum’s own Jamie Little on drums and ace-bassist Roger Innis. One of the best live gigs I’ve been to in years.

On this album called, appositely enough, “Live In England” (on Ham-Bone Records) Jamie is back behind the kit and bass duties are by Kent Beatty. However, no matter how good Loomis is on guitar (and trust me, he is amazing), this track is all about Strat Doyle’s stratospheric tenor sax playing - the man should have a government health warning slapped on him because he is single-handedly capable of blowing a hole through the ozone layer! This live track is called “Pull Strings”.

7 “Pull String” by (4:46) Hamilton Loomis from the album “Live in England” (Ham-Bone Records)

That was Texan Hamilton Loomis  from "Live in England" and now from over the pond to over the border - in this case not Mexico but Scotland - well, kind of, via Devon and the Gambia really.

We return to Julaba Kunda the duo formed by Gambia’s Juldeh Camara and Scotland’s Griselda Sanderson.

This is another track from their new album, “Traders”.

Juldeh plays the kologo and also the ritti or one string-fiddle as well as singing, whilst Griselda plays fiddle, viola and Hammond organ. The song’s called “Scotland”.

As Griselda says: “The land, its people and their music are inextricably linked. To me, a reel is a rocky path, a jig a rushing burn and a strathspey a great glen.”

As Juldeh’s lyrics say: “Beautiful Girl, pretty and sweet, you are so lovely. Please come to me! Your beauty is God’s creation, just like the mountains of Scotland.”

8 “Scotland” by (6:10) Julaba Kunda from the album “Traders” (Waulk Music)

[staying in Scotland - over the sea to Skye; Mary Ann Kennedy - the book, CD; R3 stage Womad, etc]

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9 “Ceud Soraidh, Ceud Slainte” by (4:22) The Campbells from the album “Tha Mi'n Duil” (Watercolour Music)

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[beauty of the human voice - here’s another - fado]

10 “Aforma De Querer E Ser Amada” by (3:01) Maria De Fátima from the album “Maria de Fátima Live” (Right Notes 2010 - RN1001)

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[if you thought that was beautiful take a listen to this - Indonesian - dutch based songstress - need more info on this]

11 “Tembang Pahlawan” by (5:28) Julya Lo'ko & Erwin Van Ligten from the album “Krongcong Baru” (Little Wing 004)

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[a little slice of Paradise - name of the next song - mention Joanne and the scholarship]

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12 “Paraíso” by (4:00) Joanne Vance from the album “Silencios Incómodos”

[CHANGE THE CD HERE!!]

[from Paradise to the crazy streets of Addis Ababa - mention Dub Colossus at Womad - how good it was - my interview with Nick Page (Dubulah) and Mykael Riley and PJ Higgins etc]

(1) 13 “Guragigna” by (5:15) Dub Colossus from the album “Addis Through The Looking Glass” (Real World Records)

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[from the Ethiopian highlands to the desert lands in this case those around Stoke Newington in London - Tombolinos and Womad and Home and Desert Rain - bit of sub-Balkanic madness]

(2) 14 “Desert Rain” by (3:06) The Magic Tombolinos from the album “Full Attack With Sudden Defenses” (International Records)

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[More Balkanic fun here - this time from AKB]

(3) 15 “Marusja” by (4:54) Amsterdam Klezmer Band from the album “Katla” (Essay Recordings)

[Womad and Ebo]

(4) 16 “Love And Death” by (8:20) Ebo Taylor & Uhuru-Yenzu from the album “Life Stories - Highlife & Afrobeat Classics 1973-1980” (Strut)

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[---CONTINUOUS---]

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(5) 17 “Campanario 64” by (6:32) The Spam Allstars from the album “Introducing Spam Allstars” (World Music Network)

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[about the Spams - keeping in a latin mood but old school for last two - Colombia! on Soundway]

(6) 18 “Las Calenas Son Como Los Flores” by (3:56) The Latin Brothers from the album “Colombia!” (Soundway CD008)

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[and to finish some more flowers - my all-time favourite gaita: the Gaita of the Flowers!]

(7) 19 “Gaita De Las Flores” by (2:52) Lucho Bermúdez from the album “Colombia!” (Soundway CD008)

WorldBeatUK (22nd Show) - Broadcast Notes (27/7/11)

Tagged with: WorldBeatUK Glyn Phillips Daniel Nebiat Mohammed Diaby Yves Lambert Toy Hearts Mabon 9bach Bombino Joe Arroyo Dominguinhos Criolina Ze Paulo Alexandre Lima Big Landin Sexto Sentido Goldmaster Allstars Easy Star DLG Sabbo Ophex 4centers Z-Funkster DJ Lucio

 WBUK22 (27/7/11) - SHOWNOTES

1 Intro-Mat 1:47 Matchatcha Nyekesse (Aimer La Danse)

Welcome to the show! Over the next couple of hours I’ve got lots of lovely tunes coming up on the show this evening with a few particular focusses.

We check out the New Canadians - mostly of African origin - as well as some Quebecois folk from French-speaking Eastern Canada.

We keep folky with music from Wales and the UK, check out a few more Womad acts and bring some Brazilian warmth and sunshine to our changeable British Summer.

Finally WorldBeatUK takes a fresh look at the Fab Four (yes, that Fab Four!) reinterpreted in a plethora of styles and we end with a welter of remixes, refixes and general mashups - with a few surprises thrown in for good measure - so make sure you stick around till the end of the show.

So, let’s start at the top and go to Canada. Forget Mounties and Lumberjacks, the New Canadians are a disparate bunch from all over the world, including latinos, Punjabis and Africans.

Whilst out at the Womex exhibition last year in Copenhagen I met up with a fascinating woman called Nadine McNulty who is both radio DJ in Toronto (for CIUT FM) and a promoter of African music. She pointed me in the direction of some of Canada’s new residents and their music.

I’ve played a few over the past few weeks including Cheka Katenen Dioubate and Saa Andrew Gbongbor, but I’m going to showcase a few more this week from East Africa, West Africa and Southern Africa.

First off is an artist described as "Toronto’s Krar Star”, Daniel Nebiat. Now, the krar is an East African instrument best described as a 5 or 6 string lyre, that is: a small hand-held harp.

Daniel Nebiat is originally from Eritrea that small country that lies along the coast of the Red Sea near the Horn of Africa and which only regained its independence from Ethiopia in 1993 after a 30 year war.

Nebiat describes his music as a mix of Eritrean Country and New Country - but don’t be thinking stetsons, cowboy boots and Hawaian slide guitars! The music mostly features traditional grooves in 6/8 time and is sung in Tigrinya, with support from the Sudanese Waleed Abdulhameed on bass amongst other things.

Nebiat fancied being a musician and originally took up playing the krar at age 12 when he saved up enough money through singing to buy one - his mother had other ideas however and chopped up his harp for firewood! He had to wait until he moved to Addis in Ethiopia when he was 17 before he could properly take it up again eventually ending up in Kenya for a couple of years before emigrating to Canada in 1996. This is the title track from his 2008 debut LP and it’s called “Hakimey”:

2 "Hakimey" 7:32 Daniel Nebiat "Hakimey"

Another African emigrant was guitarist, singer and composer Tichaona Daniel Maredza who only arrived in Toronto in 2008 from his native Zimbabwe.

As his publicity has it: “swooping down from the vast Zimbabwean plains … a guitar in one hand, a drum in the other and an mbira in his teeth”.

By December 2009 he’d formed a group the Tich Maredza Band with another Zimbabwean, two US ex-pats and a Colombian percussionist and hit the Toronto circuit hard with polyrhythmic grooves sung in Shona and English. This next track is called “Gadziriga”

3 "Gadziriga" 6:17 Tich Maredza Group - Zimbabwean-Canadian

This is the last of my New Canadians now - originally from Guinea in West Africa, the djembe drummer Mohammed Diaby started off at age seven and has had a full career since the age of fifteen as lead drummer with various dance groups and dance ensembles. The track I’m going to play here is from his 2007 album “Ala Na Na” (ie God Is Here) and is called “Yamama”, Yamama being a mask dance from the Samou region of Guinea utilising a rhythm of the Mandenyi people.

4 "Yamama" 3:08 Mohammed Diaby "Ala Na Na" Africa (Guinea)


OK, from Canadian African music to French Canadian music. Canada is almost two countries in one: the majority English speaking part and the Eastern French-speaking Province of Quebec whose inhabitants (les Quebecois) hold passionately onto their French language and francophile culture. And from that Francophone area we derive the next act.

The accordionist Yves Lambert is almost a living legend in Quebecois folk music both solo and for his 26 tenure with the cult band La Bottine Souriante and since 2004 with the Bebert Orchestra. However the track I’m going to play is from his Trio Yves Lambert which utilises just two other members of the Bebert Orchestra: Guitarist Olivier Rondeau and the fiddler and mandolin-player, Tommy Gauthier. This is a foot-stomping folk-tune called “Le Pere Tanasse”.

5 "Le Pere Tanasse" 3:20 Trio Yves Lambert avec Rondeau & Gauthier Quebecois

We’re going to segue from Canadian Folk to British Bluegrass! And in this case Birmingham’s very own acoustic bluegrass family the Johnsons, aka The Toy Hearts: Dad Stewart Johnson on dobro and banjo and his two daughters (now fronting the band), Sophia (on flatpicking guitar and vocals) and Hannah (lead vocals and mandolin).

The Toy Hearts have been gaining a lot of critical acclaim recently including from the ‘new rockabilly Queen’ Imelda May and legendary broadcaster ‘Whispering’ Bob Harris amongst others.

This is a single they released in October last year and it’s called “Femme Fatale”. Catch them while you can . . .

6 "Femme Fatale" (Radio Edit) 3:13 "The Toy Hearts" - Bluegrass

Staying in the UK we’re going over now to the Inter-Celtic folk band Mabon (who - as the newly reformed ‘Jamie Smith’s Mabon’) will be playing live at Womad this weekend at the Radio 3 Stage - check ‘em out if you’re going).

So here’s a track from the original Mabon line-up taken from their award-winning 2010 Live album “Live at the Grand Pavilion” (on the Easy On The Records label).

This is one’s called “Fiddlers Despair”! (even though there’s nary a fiddle to be heard - and it features Jamie’s Smith’s accordion). Either way, it’s guaranteed to get you bouncing up an down in your seat!

7 "Fiddlers Despair" (Live) 3:45 Mabon "Live At The Grand Pavillion" (Easy On The Records, 2010)

Sticking with the Welsh Womad connection this is a less traditional take on Welshness and Celtic identity.

The band are called 9bach - but I’m not sure whether that should be pronounced as 9bach (with an English 9) or Nawbach (‘now-bach’) with a Welsh pronunciation of the number 9.

Anyway, their music has been described as Portishead meets early Fairport Convention, acid folk, ‘dungeon dark psych-folk’, folktronica and even ‘pastoral yet sinister’ and ‘attractive yet disturbing’. Hmmm. You can make up your own minds on this one.

They sing in Welsh (or should I say Cymraeg) and usually feature the voice of Lisa Jen. This track is from their 2009 album “Gwymon” and is entitled “Bythyn fy Nain” which translates as “Bythyn, my Grandmother”. 9bach/NawBach will be performing at Womad in Charlton Park this weekend and if you miss them they’ll also be appearing at the Moseley Folk Festival in early September this year.

8 "Bythyn Fy Nain" 4:42 9bach “Gwymon” (2009)


Also at Womad this year is Saharan desert rocker Bombino from Niger - I’ve played both him and this track before - but it’s good enough to play again.

This is from his recent album “Agadez” and is a track called “Tar Hani” (My Love)

9 "Tar Hani (My Love)" 6:31 Bombino "Agadez" Desert Rock (Niger)

Now some of you maybe aware that the great Colombian singer Joe Arroyo passed away yesterday at the age of 55 in Barranquilla after struggling with multiple organ failures.

I’ve written a full obituary of Joe for the website WorldMusic.co.uk (www.worldmusic.co.uk/joe_arroyo_dies_in_colombia_26711) under the News section - so you can read that for a more in-depth appreciation of his life and work.

Suffice to say that the latin world and tropical music in general has lost a true original and an amazing artist.

With scores of hits to his name, both with Fruko y sus Tesos and the Latin Brothers as well as his own band La Verdad, Joe wrote the soundtrack to his life.

I can’t do him justice here in this short space of time, so I’ll let his music speak for him: one of the greatest salsa tracks of all time on almost every level, this is the seminal “Rebelión”:

10 "Rebelión" 6.12 Joe Arroyo y la Verdad "Rebellion" (World Circuit 1989)

RIP Joe Arroyo who died yesterday.

Let’s stay in latin america for the next few tracks, but this time we’ll head south to the vast country of Brazil. We might not be getting all the sun and warmth we think we deserve in this country, but just close your eyes, listen to this music and you can almost feel that tropical tingle on your skin!

This is the Criolina re-edit of Dominguinhos’s forro entitled “Toque de Pife Sem o Brasil”:

11 "Toque de Pife Sem o Brasi"l 2:49 Dominguinhos (Criolina re-edit) Forro

--- [CONTINUOUS]---

12 "Batom Vermelho" 2:58 Ze Paulo "Rough Guide to the Music of Brazil" Samba

[CHANGE THE CD!]

Don’t forget you’re tuned into Rhubarb Radio and listening to WorldBeatUK with me Glyn Phillips, your host for two hours of fantastic music from around the world.

You can hear WorldBeatUK every Wednesday between 7pm and 9pm (UK time) by logging onto www.rhubarbradio.com and I’ll bring you my own eclectic selection of old hits, new releases and ones that got away!

I’m going to carry on now with the Brazilian summer feel and this lovely, lilting live offering of samba pagode from the band Turma do Pagode and a track called ”Greve de Amor”:


(1) 13 "Greve de Amor" 2:31 Turma do Pagode "Turma do Pagode" Samba

--- [CONTINUOUS]---

(2) 14 "Sunshine (Simples Cançao)" (3:05) by Alexandre Lima E Radio Experienza from “Meu Apartamento É Pequeno Mas Tenho O Lado De Fora Para Andar”

You just heard the a track called "Sunshine (Simples Canção)" by the Brazilian Alexandre Lima e Radio Experienza from his rather awkward but intriguingly entitled album “Meu Apartamento É Pequeno Mas Tenho O Lado De Fora Para Andar” (which translates as ‘My apartment is small, but I have the outside bit to walk around in’!).

Ok, let’s leave Brazil now and head into a section of the show that I’ve been planning for a few months now - gradually building a library of tunes I can use in it. This is all about the Fab Four!  Yep, that Fab Four - Los Beatles - The Beatles.

Yes, you might well ask, what are they doing in a world music show? Isn’t that stretching the boundaries a bit? But folks, this is ME we’re talking about! You don’t think I’m going to give you the originals do you? No, no, no! Tish, tish! I’ve lined up half a dozen different versions and mashups that might have you either applauding or wincing in turn. I’ve no idea. But I like them!

First up we go to Venezuela and one of their great ska bands (yes, Venezuela does have great ska bands!!).

This is La Big Landin Orquesta and from their album “SKAterriza” an early Beatles tune called “I Should Have Known Better”.

(3) 15 "I Should Have Known Better" 3:47 La Big Landin Orquesta "SKAterriza" Ska Venezolano

Yeah, ha ha! Well I liked it: "I Should Have Known Better" performed by Venezuela’s Big Landin Orchestra.

Incidentally when that was released by the Beatles it became a Number 1 in Norway in 1964.

Now inevitably this leads me onto the appalling murders in Norway last week. We can only imagine the horror of such events. It still seems unreal. Just like the States after 9/11, Norway is in a state of shock and fear. And this is the time for people to reach out to others.

This might seem hard to believe, but I’d already programmed this next track into my show the week before the news came out about Oslo and Utoeya and also about the death of Amy Winehouse. So please don’t think I’m cashing in with this one - it’s pure coincidence but I think a very valid contribution to the show.

As I said above this is a time to come together, look for commonality amongst each other not differences. It’s a mash-up by the Brazilian DJ Lucio K and it brings together Amy Winehouse and the Beatles. This is “Come Together Good”:

(4) 16 "Come Together Good (DJ LK MASHUP") (4:12) "Beatles vs Amy Winehouse - DJ LK Mashup" Rock/RnB Mashup

--- [CONTINUOUS]---

(5) 17 "Eleanor Rigby (4Centers Remixxxxx)" (3:53) Beatles - Rockstep Mashup

Well there you had a dubstep version of The Beatles’ “Eleanor Rigby” remixed by 4Centers. A timely reminder to care for the distressed, mentally ill and lonely.

From a song of sadness and loneliness and neglect, to one of love and beauty - “Michelle” - and especially this treatment of it by Sexto Sentido.

Anyone that’s heard me play any music by these four Cuban women will have heard me wax lyrical about them. I just love them.

And this tune if ever there was, is a balm for the soul. It’s as if honey was made into music.

From their second album “Bossa Cubana” this is Sexto Sentido and “Michelle”

(6) 18 "Michelle" (5:52) Sexto Sentido "Bossa Cubana" Latin

Was that not just perfection on a plate? I defy any vocal group to do better! Aaaaaah!

OK, sticking with The Beatles theme still for another couple of numbers this is another tune I love and a version which I think equals the original.

From Southend on Sea this is the UK’s very own Goldmaster All Stars - a wonderful reggae and ska band - and their reggae version of “Don’t Let Me Down” from their album “Crossroads”:

(7) 19 "Don’t Let Me Down" (3:48) Goldmaster Allstars "Crossroads" Reggae

Wasn’t that good? Final one now in The Beatles themed section of the show.

This is a band I played last week for Lucy, the Easy Stars All Stars but this time featuring Luciano on vocals.

Here’s something that we could all do with: a little help from our friends . . .

(8) 20 "With A Little Help From My Friends" (3:13) Easy Star All-Stars Feat. Luciano "Easy Star's Lonely Hearts Dub Band" Reggae

Change of pace now and three remixes in the styles of Latin Funk, Baile Funk and Reggae.

First one is a tune that was well known to any salsero in this country at least who was around in the 90s.

Originally made famous by Juan Luis Guerra and later covered by other artists (including this version here which is from a Venezuelan band - but I don’t know which one I’m afraid) and here given a hard-edged latin funk remix by Z-Funkster this is going out to all ex-members of the 90s Brummie latin dance outfit Caramba - “Woman del Callao”

(9) 21 "Woman del Callao" (4:16) Z-Funkster "Azucah Selectah" Latin - Funk


Let’s rack it up a gear again.

All the way from Vilnius, Lithuania in the Baltic come the 21 year old remixer Karolis Rimkus aka Ophex.

This is a piece of what is I suppose Lithuanian folk put through Ophex’s kitchen blender and inspired by baile funk from the favelas of Brazil. It’s certainly different!

(10) 22 "Valkininkai" (2:54) Ophex "10.000 Kilometers From Rio" Baile Funk

Time for goodbyes now:

[Shout outs, reminders and thank yous, etc]

This is a remix by Sabbo of the Everley Brothers hit “Bye Bye Love” mashed up with lyrics from Busy Signal.

So what more can I say but “Bye Bye”:

(11) 23 "Bye Bye (Sabbo beat-up)" (3:17) Busy Signal (Sabbo remix) Reggae

Just enough time hopefully to squeeze this one in. DLG and a lovely bachata called “Eres Mi Vida”.

(12) 24 "Eres Mi Vida" (4:52) DLG "Gotcha"

WorldBeatUK (21st Show) - Broadcast Notes (20/7/11)

Tagged with: WorldBeatuk Glyn Phillips Aurelio Martinez Baaba Maal Vieux Farka Toure Fatoumata Diawara Danyel Waro Pacific Curls Bellowhead AfroCubism Booker T Bomba Estereo Easy Star Smerins Anti-Social Club Dub Colossus Samuel Yirga Tombolinos Mahala Rai Haidouks

 WBUK21 (20/7/11) - SHOWNOTES

1 “Intro-Mat” (1.47) by Matchatcha from the album “Nyekesse” (Melodie)

Hello there!  You’re tuned into Rhubarb Radio and you’re listening to WorldBeatUK.  My name’s Glyn Phillips and over the next two hours I’ll be taking you on a journey to the outer reaches of global musicality.   On the show tonight you’ll get to hear some fabulous acts from Senegal, Mali, the USA, Colombia, Ghana, Cuba, L’ile de Reunion, Belize, Jamaica, New Zealand, Ethiopia, Romania and the UK amongst others.

In fact tonight’s show is all about WOMAD - the World of Music and Dance - which takes place in just over a week at Charlton Park, near Malmesbury in Gloucestershire, England.  This amazing event is still probably the planet’s leading global festival of world music open to the general public. 
  
So, although I still have no idea of whether I’ll actually be able attend it this year, I’ve decided to dedicate the show tonight to Womad; in short every tune you hear from now on is by an artiste who will be appearing at this year’s Womad Festival! 

I can’t promise whether they will actually play these particular tracks but it should give you a taste of what to expect if you are lucky enough to go next week - and if you can’t, then you sit back and pretend you’re there (and save yourself a fortune into the bargain!).  

OK, first up I’m going to ease us into the groove with some garifuna soul from Belize.  Now, Belize is a small country in Central America and amongst its accolades is that it has the second longest barrier reef in the world, is the northernmost country in Central America (remember folks, Mexico is technically in North America!) and is the only Central American country to have English as the official language.  

This tiny country - which is only 120 miles long and 68 miles wide - boasts a population of just 333, 200 people. 

It’s history is also different to its neighbours Mexico and Guatemala - who have deep Hispanic roots alongside their Mayan ancestry - since it was for many years a British Colony known as British Honduras, only gaining independence in 1973 and having a permanent British troop presence based there armed with vertical take-off Harrier Hawk jets to protect it from Guatemalan invasion until as recent as1994. 

So now you know!  

However, we’re really interested in its current musical contribution and for that we have to go to the Caribbean coastline and to the Garifuna communities of Belize

Belize has many different populations, but one of its smallest - making up only 4% - are the Garínagu (often known by the singular Garífuna) who are a community of mixed African, Carib and Arawak descent who speak and sing in a language descended from both Carib and Arawak. 

They can be found along much of Central America’s Caribbean coastline from Nicaragua and Honduras up to Guatemala and Belize. 

So the first song up tonight is a piece of ‘paranda’ music by one of the Garifuna culture’s most well known artists, the Honduran born, Belizean based, Aurelio Martinez, taken from his album “Garifuna Soul” on the Belizean Stonetree Records; this is called “Lumalali Limaniga”:

2 Lumalali Limaniga (4:18) by Aurelio Martinez from the album “Garifuna Soul” on the Stone Tree Records Label

Yes, there you go, Aurelio Martinez from Belize.  Now, I’ve got a bit of an African thing going on for the next few numbers and I’m going to kick this off with an old track by Senegal’s Baaba Maal - one of the biggest names in African music for Europeans especially during the 1990s.  It’s a wonderfully summery piece called “Demgalan”.

3 “Demgalan” (7:01) by Baaba Maal from the album “Kings of African Music” on the Nascente label

From Senegal, we move inland to Mali and to Vieux Farka Touré, the son of the late guitarist Ali Farka Toure. 

This is taken from his latest album - just released in May - called “The Secret” on the Six Degrees label. 

This track features Derek Trucks on electric guitar and is called “Aigna”

4 Aigna (Feat. Derek Trucks) (4:53) by Vieux Farka Touré from the album “The Secret” on the Six Degrees Records label

Let’s stay in Mali now and the wonderful singer and actress Fatoumata Diawara recently heard supporting AfroCubism and providing backing vocals on their album. 

Here she is on a pre-release track from her forthcoming EP Kanou and this is the title track from that.

5 “Kanou” (3.56) by Fatoumata Diawara from the EP “Kanou”

Hmmm, very beautiful, calming music!  Fatoumata Diawara there.

We’re going to board a plane now to an island in the middle of the Indian Ocean with a very rich and vibrant mixture of cultures: Malagasy, Indian, African, European and Chinese.  

The L’isle de La Réunion is an island with a French Colonial past and indeed present since it is (like Guadeloupe and Martinique in the Caribbean) an official ‘departement’ of France. 

This island of 800,000 people is about 120 miles south of Mauritius and roughly the same size (under 30 miles wide by 40 long). 

The largest percentage of the population is mixed race to some degree or other and it’s from this Creole culture that the music of La Reunion predominantly derives.  

One of their most famous musicians is Danyel Waro, who is also a poet and activist - a tireless campaigner for the rights and cultures of Creole people.  Danyel was last year awarded the 2010 Artist Award at the annual Womex World Music conference held in Copenhagen. 

Waro is also a pioneer and flagbearer for the indigenous music of La Reunion known as Maloya  - a mix of African and Malagasy rhythms, that was once banned from being played in La Reunion.  This is a track called “Veli”.

6 “Veli” (4.40) by Danyel Waro from the album “Aou Amwin” on the Cobalt label (2010)

If we board the Good Ship 'WorldBeatUK' and set sail south and eastwards from the Indian Ocean, we eventually pass by Australia and end up in New Zealand

This next band are called Pacific Curls - a trio of young women who aim to fuse European and Maori roots via ukulele, fiddle, Taonga Puoro guitar, alongside cajon, stompbox and kalimba and lyrics in Maori, Rotuman and English. 

This ukulele-driven piece is called “Pacific People” from their last album "Te Kore".

7 “Pacific People” (4.22) by Pacific Curls from the album “Te Kore”

That was “Pacific People” by the Pacific Curls from New Zealand.

So in true WorldBeatUK style let’s jet from one end of the earth to the other. 

Back to Blighty and to Britain’s rowdy folksters Bellowhead

This is a track from the recently released compilation album “Rough Guide to English Folk” on the World Music Network label. 

Bellowhead would like to invite you to come on down to Yarmouth Town!

8 “Yarmouth Town” (3.50) by Bellowhead from the album “The Rough Guide To English Folk” on the World Music Network label

Ha ha!  Great bit of English folky fun there with some quasi-New Orleans brass band jazzy bits rolled into the mix!  Bellowhead and “Yarmouth Town”.   

And now from the wonderfully exuberant to the absolutely sublime. 

This is the amazing malicubano sound of the international superstar band AfroCubism formed out of living legends from both Mali and Cuba. 

This band was put together by the UK's very own World Circuit Records label. 

You can read my in-depth review of their debut album “Afro-Cubism” on the world music website (http://www.worldmusic.co.uk/afrocubism_afrocubism).   

These guys are going to be one of the BIG bands this year at Womad (and don’t forget that ALL of the bands I’m playing tonight on the show are appearing at this year’s WOMAD festival at Charlton Park next week). 

This is my favourite track off what is an amazing album. 

The track was written by the Malian Kora maestro Toumani Diabate and it’s called “Jarabi”. 

Simply sumptuous!!

9 “Jarabi” (5.57) by AfroCubism from the album “AfroCubism” on the World Circuit label

Now that’s the kind of band you’d expect at a world music festival - but maybe this next one raised a few eyebrows when they were announced. 

Booker T and the MGs are some of the great survivors of the 60s and 70s with numerous hits to their credit and even more amazing seeing as their speciality was instrumentals. 

The longevity, popularity and sheer funkiness of their cuts is high testimony indeed to their ineffable grooves.  

This is the hipswinging hit “Hip Hug Her” - here given a tasty remix by Danny Massure!

10 “Hip Hug Her (Danny Massure remix)” (3.34) by Booker T & the MGs

[CONTINUOUS]

11 “Cosita Rica” (4:36) by Bomba Estereo from the album "Estalla" on Polen Records

[CHANGE THE CDs OVER!!!]

You’re listening to WorldBeatUK - the two hour world music radio show right here on Rhubarb Radio, transmitting from The Custard Factory in Digbeth in the heart of Birmingham in the heart of England! 

My name’s Glyn Phillips and don’t forget tonight’s WorldBeatUK is given over to featuring bands that will be appearing at next week’s Womad Festival at Charlton Park, near Malmesbury.  

You were just listening to the Electro-Cumbiaton sounds of Colombia’s Bomba Estereo -  a feisty young band that mix indigenous cumbia with electronica and a vivacious punk attitude when seen live - and a track called “Cosita Rica”.

Next up is a track and a sound to die for!!  One of the great unsung pioneers of Highlife and Afrobeat, belatedly getting his dues paid to him. 

This is the amazing Mr Ebo Taylor of Ghana and a track from the Strut Records album “Life Stories - Highlife and Afrobeat Classics 1973-1980”. 

I said it’s a sound to die for - and appropriately enough it’s called “Heaven”!

(1) 12 Heaven (6:04) by Ebo Taylor from the album “Life Stories - Highlife & Afrobeat Classics 1973-1980” (Strut Records)

I first came across the next band a few years back and they blew me away.  They have up to now specialised in taking classic albums and re-doing them dub-style. 

What’s special about them is the conceptualisation of how they approach each of these revered albums and the amazing attention to detail in the execution of them. 

I first heard their version of the Pink Floyd classic, renamed as the "Dub Side of the Moon" and then Radiohead’s “OK Computer” redubbed (sorry for the rather obvious pun there!) as "Radiodread".   

This next track which features Frankie Paul is taken from their 2009 release, a reworking of The Beatles’ Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band appropriately enough called: The Easy Star’s Lonely Hearts Dub Band.  This is going out to the missus - what else but “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds”

(2) 13 “Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds” (4:33) by the Easy Star All-Stars (feat. Frankie Paul) from the album “Easy Star's Lonely Hearts Dub Band” (Easy Star Records)

Yes, yes, the Easy Star All-Stars and “Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds” from the “Lonely Hearts Dub Band” album.  Incidentally they’ve also released a remix version of their first album called “Dubber Side of the Moon” last year and this year should have released their first album of original tunes called “First Light”.

OK, since we were up in the sky with Lucy and her diamonds just now, it seems appropriate to play this next track: “Walking In the Air” - and, no, there’s not even a hint of Aled Jones about it!

(3) 14 “Walking In The Air” (3:16) by Smerins Anti-Social Club

Ha ha ha!

Yes, that was Britain’s very own Smerins Anti-Social Club and their ska-tastic version of “Walking In The Air”!!  Love that - and not a snowman in sight . . .

And whilst we’re on this ska and reggae tip here’s a MONSTER tune! 

This one gets me every time I play it. 

Definitely my hot hit for Womad this year. 

The most excellent Anglo-Ethiopian band Dub Colossus and an amazing Ethiopian dub version of Althea & Donna’s brilliant tune “Uptown Top Ranking”! 

ABSOLUTELY love this one. 

Can’t praise it high enough! 

People, I tell you, turn up the volume and get skanking!

(4) 15 “Uptown Top Ranking (radio edit)” (4:17) by Dub Colossus from the album “Addis Through The Looking Glass” on Real World Records

[CONTINUOUS]

(5) 16 “Habasha Diaspora (Addis Piano Mix)” (6:05) by Samuel Yirga from the album “The Habasha Sessions” (released by Bower and Wilkins Society of Sound)

Wow!  Breathtaking!  That was another insight into what’s making Ethiopia utterly irresistible these days.  That was the young pianist Samuel Yirga (who was also on the previous track by Dub Colossus) and a tune called “Habasha Diaspora” (the Addis Piano mix) from an as yet unreleased album due out later this year.  Keep an ear out for that: Samuel Yirga.

Ok, we haven’t had much Balkanic music recently on the show - so let’s change that. 

First of all here’s a UK based band made up from an Argentine, a Portuguese and three Italians. 

They mix up balkan, latin, jazz, punk and well, to be honest, pretty much anything they can get their hands on! 

Confused?  Don’t worry, just let the music get inside you. 

I saw these guys a few weeks ago at the HOME Festival in Devon - and they are a truly magic band to see live - don’t miss them at Womad this year if you can.  Appropriately enough they are called Alejandro and the Magic Tombolinos and this is a tune called “Vera Cocek” from their album "Full Attack with Sudden Defences".

(6) 17 “Vera Cocek” (4:09) by Alejandro & The Magic Tombolinos from the album “Full Attack with Sudden Defences” on Nu Power Ethno label

Over to the one of the major repositories of European gypsy culture, Romania.  This is the Mahala Rai Banda and a track called “Hora Din Mahala”

At this point I should shout out some linguistically appropriate exhortation for all of you to dance, but here my knowledge of Romania ends, so shout out whatever you want to and just jiggle, bounce and shake your bits to heart’s content!  

(7) 18 “Hora Din Mahala” (3:19) by Mahala Rai Banda from the album “Ghetto Blasters” on the Asphalt Tango label

[CONTINUOUS]

(8) 19 “A Gypsy Had A House” (3:47) by Taraf De Haïdouks from the album “Band Of Gypsies” on the Crammed Discs label

Wasn’t that wonderful! 

That was Taraf de Haïdouks also from Romania and a track called "O Tsigan Ave o Casa" - which translates as “A Gypsy Had A House”, from the album “Band of Gypsies”.

OK that’s it - we’re at the end of the show and so I want to thank all of you for listening in to this WOMAD Special - remember every band you’ve heard tonight is appearing at Womad Festival in Charlton Park, next week.  For a full list of all the tracks I’ve played tonight and all previous weeks please go to www.worldmusic.co.uk/radio and you’ll find all the info you need.

[Final shout-outs, thanks etc]

And to finish the UK’s own Jazz Jamaica and one of my favourite tracks of theirs. 

From the 1998 album “Double Barrel” this is their remake of the old Skatalites groover “Confucious”.

(9) 20 “Confucious” (5:01) by Jazz Jamaica from the album “Double Barrel” (Hannibal 1998)

WorldBeatUK (20th Show) - Broadcast Notes (13/7/11)

Tagged with: WorldBeatUK Glyn Phillips Adam Rapa Ziroli Winterstein Sound Nomaden Paito Simmer Down Festival Supa Bassie Sam Redmore Skaguitar Kiko Perrone Fissunix Fermin Muguruza Luke Daniels Julio Sosa Lucia de la Cruz Ibrahim Ferrer Altan Festibyn Malavoi

WBUK20 (13/7/11) - SHOWNOTES

1 “Intro-Mat” (1:47) by Matchatcha from the album “Nyekesse” (Melodie)

You’re listening to Rhubarb Radio transmitting live from the Custard Factory, Digbeth, Birmingham - I’m Glyn Phillips and this is WorldBeatUK!  

Coming up on the show tonight: Gypsy Swing, Calypso Jazz, Salsa Dura, Ska, Reggae, Bachata, Gaita, Electro Swing, Tango, Musette, Vals, Blues, and even Brazilian Blues.  

We’ve also got some Son, Folk, Township Jazz, Mashups, Balkan, Biguine and some great SambaReggaeRumbaPatchankaBreakbeat!  Trust me, you don’ wanna miss it tonight!  So fasten your sonic seatbelts, make yourself comfortable and enjoy the ride!

Welcome to the 20th edition of WorldBeatUK!  Yet another jamboree bag of sweeties from around the world - coz yo’ve all bin good boys and girls since the last time I saw ya!  So’s I thought as I’d get yer a bag o’ suck!  

Since last week I’ve had to take a few days out to attend the funeral of a dearly beloved uncle who passed away unexpectedly, so I have not done the same amount of research into the tunes this week that I normally do.  

However, despair not since the quality of the music is just the same and I’ve some right little gems lined up.  So, I’m dedicating the whole of this week’s show to the memory of my Uncle Reg - a top bloke indeed who will be sorely missed by anyone who came into contact with him.  Always upbeat and positive and full of life - what more can I say? - so here’s something to reflect that. This is Adam Rapa and an exuberant track called “Calypso”.

2 “Calypso” (5:00) by Adam Rapa

And to follow that? How about some salsa dura from the album “Boogaloo Pow Wow”?  The band’s the La Playa Orchestra and this track is called “Olvidate De Mi”.  Get yer dancing shoes on - a bailar!!!

3 “Olvidate De Mi” (2:51) by The La Playa Orchestra from the album “Boogaloo Pow Wow”

Breathless?  Here’s a little bit of manouche beauty for you: from the Rough Guide to Gypsy Swing this is the Ziroli Winterstein Ensemble and “Autumn Leaves”

4 “Autumn Leaves” (Ends at 2.20!) (2:26) by Ziroli Winterstein Ensemble from the album “Rough Guide to Gypsy Swing” 

Wasn’t that beautiful.  And so - inevitably - the link: this is Electro-Swing outfit Sound Nomaden and a tune called “Beautiful Music”:

5 “Beautiful Music” (4:16) by Sound Nomaden from the album “Beautiful Music”

[CONTINUOUS]

6 “El Gusto De Las Mujeres” (4:28) by Paíto (Sixto Silgado) from the album “Gaita Negra”

That last track was called “El Gusto de las Mujeres” and was an instrumental piece by Paíto (aka Sixto Silgado) from the album “Gaita Negra”.  Incidentally, I’d better explain what gaita means.  It’s a Spanish word which refers in most instances to bagpipes; it also refers to a piped instrument known in English as a fipple flute which is native to Colombia, Venezuela and parts of Panama and is blown direct (ie rather than using a bag to store a continuous current of air).  As well as that it’s also the name of the Colombian music where the gaitas are often employed and is related to cumbia.  So now you know!

And to follow that some Dominican bachata music by the New York band Fame - who are based in the Bronx - and a track called “Confesiones”

7 “Confesiones” (3:27) by Fame


Big up the Simmer Down Festival - Sat Jul 16th 12midday to 7.30pm in Handsworth Park, Birmingham.  Free.  Ken Boothe headlining and also Rose Capri, Claire Angel, Gabbidon, Reggaebaby Lounge, Hearts Aglow Steelband, Pulse Beat (a Steel Pulse tribute band), Louise Kilbride, Village Well, Glama Wayne, Maria Mour, Bingiman, Unique, Si Hayden, Kokumo, Lee Alexander, Annette Fagon and many more as well as ital food, dhol players, bhangra dancers and zumba dancers.  It’ll be a family affair with plenty of workshops in dance and music and a procession too.  

After the free event in the park the action shifts to The Drum in Newtown where there’s the Simmer Down Festival After Party with Barry Biggs, Ken Boothe, John Maclean, Paul Dawkins, Janet Lee Davis, Rose Capri and Delia all backed by the New Direction Band and also there’ll be DJs Mr Romantic, Gatecrash and Countryman with the Fatal Attraction Sound System. Tickets for that £20 in advance (MOTD).

So to get us in the mood a selection of reggae sounds - but, as ever with me, maybe not quite as you’d expect them!  First up is Supa Bassie from Valencia in Spain and a track from his album “Crónicas de un Viaje” called “Paremos Un Segundo” (Let’s stop for a second).  Trust me, not as you’d expect at all . . .

8 “Paremos Un Segundo” (3:52) by Supa Bassie from the album “Crónicas de un Viaje”

Sticking with the alternative reggae vibe here are a couple of remixes from Birmingham’s very own Sam Redmore.  Firstly his ultra-stripped back version of Bob Marley’s “Is This Love” - beautiful.

9 “Is This Love” (Sam Redmore's Acoustic Takedown) (6:17) by Bob Marley

[CONTINUOUS]

10 “A Day In The Life / Milk & Honey” (3:26) by The Beatles / Prince Fatty (Sam Redmore Remix)

Yeah that was the second in the double-bill of Sam Redmore remixes, in this case a mashup of Prince Fatty with the Beatles: “A Day In The Life / Milk & Honey”.  Absolutely love that one!  Brum’s got talent indeed. 

OK, check this next tune out it’s a version of the old Cuban tune “El Manisero” (known to many people - especially jazzheads - by its English translation as The Peanut Vendor”), but done here in wonderfully nuanced minor form of ska by the band Skaguitar.  Lovely.

11 “El Manisero” (ends at 2.43!) (2:52) by Skaguitar

[Change CD!!!!]

Yes, wasn’t that beautiful!  Don’t forget you’re listening to WorldBeatUK right here on Rhubarb Radio, coming at ya live and direct from the Custard Factory in downtown Digbeth, Birmingham in the heart of England.  My name’s Glyn Phillips and every Wednesday between 7and 9pm I’m your host on a two hour musical journey around the world.

Plenty of good stuff still to come on the show tonight including Biguine, Balkan, Township Jazz, Mashups, remixes, Breakbeats, Musette, Folk, Tango, Vals, Cuban son and even a little ditty by one of Scotland’s most under-rated cultural icons who seems to be having a spot of trouble trying to locate one of his garments . . . 

Maybe he needs a little good luck, something bluesman Mr Clarence “Gatemouth” Brown knows all about.  

1 (12) “Someday My Luck Will Change” (5:32) by Clarence "Gatemouth" Brown from the album “Froots 05”

Yeah, “Someday, My Luck Will Change” by Clarence “Gatemouth” Brown.  

Let’s follow that with some Brazilian Blues - or at least a tune called “Luz Azul” which means ‘Blue Light’. I don’t have a lot of info about it apart from that it was written in London a couple of years ago by the Paulista Kiko Perrone alongside Kita Steur and was influenced by the music of Jorge Benjor.

2 (13) “Luz Azul (aka Blue Light)” (3:45) by Kiko Perrone & Kita Steur

[CONTINUOUS]

3 (14) “Ain’t No Stairway High Enough to Hip Hop Heaven” (3:37) by Marvin Gaye & Led Zeppelin & Gramatik Remashed (Fissunix remash)

Yeah, bet you didn’t see that one coming did you!  That was the Fissunix remash of Gramatik’s remash of Marvin Gaye and Led Zeppelin and a tune called “Aint No Stairway High Enough to Hip Hop Heaven”.  Heavenly Groove indeed!

Ready to rumba?!  Here’s a groove for you, this is the riddim version of “Milakabilaka” by Fermin Muguruza (who’s name incidentally translates as ‘Various Artists’!!) and a thumping piece of Samba-Reggae-Rumba-Patchanka-Breakbeat!

4 (15) “Milakabilaka (Riddim)” (5:32) by Fermin Muguruza from the album “Asthmatic Lion Sound System” {Samba-Reggae-Rumba-Patchanka-Breakbeats}

Well that should have got you all fired-up, so let’s all cool down again with a little musette from Luke Daniels called “Musette a Teresa”.

5 (16) “Musette À Teresa” (3:35) by Luke Daniels from the album “Froots 03”

And because I’m feeling all old schooly and in a criollo mood here’s one of my favourite old school tangueros - no, not Carlos Gardel (who to be perfectly honest, never really did it for me), but el Varón del Tango himself Julio Sosa and a track called “Mano a Mano” (Hand to Hand).

6 (17) “Mano A Mano” (3:17) by Julio Sosa from the album “30 Aniversario 1964-1994”

And if that hasn’t made you nostalgic and romantic enough, this one’ll slay you.  The incomparable Peruvian songstress and larger-than-life character Lucia de La Cruz - a woman whose life is every bit as melodramatic as the songs she sings.  I love her every bit as much as I do Eva Ayllón, no matter how much scandal seems to surround her - she simply lives the life she sings about. This is called “Quiero Que Estes Conmigo” (I Want You To Be With Me).  Straight from the heart, boys and girls, straight from the heart . . .

7 (18) “Quiero Que Estes Conmigo” (3:04) by Lucia de la Cruz

Fantastic.  Now sticking with latin america we’re travelling North from Coastal Perú to the island of Cuba and the sad news that last week the world lost yet another celebrated member of the Buena Vista Social Club as well as being a founder of Los Zafiros (The Sapphires).  I’m talking of the guitarist Manuel Galbán.  Ironically I’d already programmed in the next tune into this week’s show, before I knew about Galbán’s death.  

It doesn’t really feature him as such since he’s just another all-star member of a band backing Ibrahim Ferrer, but he’s there all the same.  If I get a chance at the end of the programme I’ll see if I can find a tune where you can hear Galbán more.  In the meantime this is a storming tune from Ibrahim’s great album “Buenos Hermanos” (Good Brothers) on World Circuit Records.  This is my favourite tune off that album - ‘listen to the advice!’, “Oye El Consejo”:

8 (19) “Oye El Consejo” (3:26) by Ibrahim Ferrer from the album “Buenos Hermanos”

[CONTINUOUS]

9 (20) “Tommy Peoples/ The Windmill/ Fintan McManus’s” (3:16) by Altan from the album “Froots 03”

That was enough to raise the devil - a medley of “Tommy Peoples/ The Windmill/ Fintan McManus’s” by the Irish band Altan.  

Now, from Sconny Botland, is the next artist.  Undoubtedly one of Caledonia’s most under-rated performers and almost forgotten these days, this man put the High into Highland with such classics as “A Scottish Soldier”, “The Muckin o’ Geordie’s Byre”, “I’ve Never Kissed a Bonnie Lass Before”, “The Gallant Forty-Twa”, as well as the song I’m about to play you.  

Now, before the days of Jools Holland’s Hootenanny, television on New Years Eve in the 1960s meant one thing “The White Heather Club”.  Many’s the time I was left alone to see the New Year in with nothing but a load of tartan-kilted Jocks dancing the Highland Fling over a pair of crossed claymores, whilst some dodgy geezer hopped through a studio door on one foot whilst carrying a lump of coal . . .  

Come on, you must know who I’m talking about by now?  Caledonian Cultural Icon Supreme, Mr Andy Stewart of course!  And the tune? Well, that’d be telling, but I’ll give you a clue: he wrote it in 10 minutes whilst sitting on the lav in a recording studio.  Just let the image linger a moment . . . OK, got it?  Oh, and watch out for Elvis half way through!

10 (21) “Donald Where's Your Troosers?” (3:21) by Andy B. Stewart

Ha ha ha!  Well, that was fun!  As is this one: a balkan banger from Festibyn called “Dönme Bana Sevgilim”.  Back on the dancefloor everyone!!  Let’s get balko-funky!

11 (22) “Dönme Bana Sevgilim” (3:16) by FestiByn from the album “FestiByn”

Not long to go now.  And since I’m feeling all warm and loved-up and dancey, I’m going to lay this next one on you.  This is South Africa’s The Soul Brothers and a track called “Thandaza”.  Let’s see you rocking to this one then!

12 (23) “Thandaza” (South Africa) (5:09) by The Soul Brothers from the album “Africa”

OK, thanks for listening to the show . . .

[Shout-outs, reminders, etc, etc]

I’m going to leave you with a particular favourite track of mine - absolutely love this one. It’s from the island of Martinique in the French-speaking Caribbean.  The band is the excellent Malavoi with special guest Jean Philippe Marthely.  The track is called “Zou”!!  

See you all next week at 7pm, or if you’re in Birmingham on Saturday in Handsworth Park for the Simmer Down Reggae Festival.  Good night!

13 (24) “Zou” ('Malavoi Biguine') (5:03) by Malavoi & Jean Philippe Marthely

WorldBeatUK (19th Show) - Broadcast Notes (6/7/11)

Tagged with: WorldBeatUK Glyn Phillips Colombiafrica Professor Elemental Zeca Pagodinho Zulu 9.30 Lisandro Meza Etubom Rex Williams Strut JuJu Ikebe Shakedown Shazalakazoo Slamboree Goy Karamelo Tommy McCook Letta Mbulu Supa Bassie Joe Claussell Nuyorican Soul Tea Sea

 WBUK19 (6/7/11) - SHOWNOTES

1 “Intro-Mat” (1:47) by Matchatcha from the album “Nyekesse” (Melodie)

Hi there, you’re listening to WorldBeatUK on Rhubarb Radio, transmitting around the world from the Custard Factory in Digbeth, Birmingham - all done through the magic of digital technology.  Such times we live in!  My name’s Glyn Phillips and for the next two hours I’ll be playing you my own idiosyncratic collation of the best in world music from around the globe; from the past and present - and looking toward the future.  

This week it’s all about the soul and the funk, the grist and the groove - and there’s a definite African and Colombian flavour to much of tonight’s sonic banquet.  So, just grab hold of yer eating irons and get stuck into the musical feast that awaits you . . .

In fact this week’s show is slightly different from normal - there’s very few new releases this time, so I thought I’d rustle through some interesting oldies, almost-newies and the ‘ones that got away’ - and in doing so I’ve managed to dig up some seriously funky-ass grooves to get you shaking yer tushes to!  

But let’s not rush it, we’ll just put the pot on to boil, gently warm up the pan and put the pulses in to soak.  You can’t rush good food.  We’ll just get you nicely simmered up for the first part of the show and, indeed, first up is the point where the South American country of Colombia (bordered by the Pacific Ocean, the Caribbean Sea and the Amazon Jungle) meets Africa (culturally speaking anyway).  

Colombiafrica - The Mystic Orchestra is a project that takes some of the best afro-colombiano musicians Viviano Torres, Luis Towers and Justo Valdez and teams them up with African musicians such as Dally Kimoko, Nyboma, Sekou Diabaté, Rigo Star and the brilliant Diblo Dibala (who, incidentally is the man behind my theme music for this show!).  The album is called “Voodoo Love Inna Champeta-Land” and this track is called “No Habla Na’” (Don’t Say Nuthin’!)

2 “No Habla Na’” (4:43) by Colombiafrica - The Mystic Orchestra from the album “Voodoo Love Inna Champeta-Land” (Riverboat Records/World Music Network)

Well, that was all rather splendid, don’t you think? Professor Elemental certainly thinks so!

3 “Splendid (Tom Caruana remix)” (3:02) by Professor Elemental from the album “More Tea (Remixes)” (Tea Sea Records)


Yes that was the wonderfully eccentric Englishman Professor Elemental and a track from his recent album “More Tea (Remixes)” called “Splendid!” - check the video out on YouTube if you can, and remember you can get his tracks direct from his website:

www.professorelemental.com

And if you’re listening Prof, hope the baby’s coming on a treat!  And stay tuned for more Elemental eccentricity later on in the show!

Last week I had a little bit too much to say (as usual!) so unfortunately I ran out of time and had to drop a track from my playlist.  Well don’t say that I don’t try and put things right straightaway.  Here’s that track a great feelgood samba tune called “Vai Vadiar” by the great Zeca Pagodinho from his album “Sem Limite”.  Goza os meus amiguinhos!

4 “Vai Vadiar” (4:07) by Zeca Pagodinho from the album “Sem Limite” (Universal Import)

 OK, let’s nip across to Barcelona for the first of two visits tonight.  This is the home of the really talented Spanish band Zulu 9.30 who are amongst the current wave of European mestizo music - a style that often mashes up latin, Jamaican, flamenco, folk, jazz, rock, punk and, well, all kinds of stuff into a danceable world groove.  It’s all grist to the mill!  This is from their album “Huellas” (which means ‘footprints’) on the Kasba label and is a salsa-based piece called “Te Llevo Conmigo” (I’m taking you with me!).

5 “Te Llevo Conmigo” (3:36) by Zulu 9.30 from the album “Huellas” (Kasba)

 And that sets us up nicely to go back over to South America for a lovely slice of 1980s cumbia from the great accordionist Lisandro Meza - probably the first cumbiambero I ever came across when I first pitched up on the shores of South America over a quarter of a century ago.  What a great sound he has.  So slap on the sombrero, sharpen your machete and mount up your burros because Lisandro is taking us to meet “Las Africanas” . . .

6 “Las Africanas” (2:18) by Lisandro Meza from the album “Lisandro’s Cumbia” (World Circuit)

[CONTINUOUS]

7 “Illusion de Amor” (4:13) by Los Chapillacs (Listen Recovery RENZ mix)

First you heard the sound of Colombian cumbia from accordionist Lisandro Meza and that was followed by psychedelic 1970s Peruvian chicha music (which is based on cumbia) by Los Chapillacs subtly remixed by Listen Recovery RENZ.

 Let’s follow that with some more old school sounds - this is from a wonderful recent compilation of old Nigerian tunes from the 1970s. 

The album is on the Strut Records label and is called “Sweet Times…”; from that is this sublime slowburner “Ama Mbre Ewa” by Etubom Rex Williams & His Nigerian Artistes.  Just kick back and let this one flow over you . . .

8 “Ama Mbre Ewa” (5:38) by Etubom Rex Williams & His Nigerian Artistes from the album “Sweet Times” (Strut Records)

Wasn’t that good?  Very trance-like feel - and talking of which this next track is from a recent album on Real World Records called “In Trance” by the Anglo-Gambian duo of Justin Adams and Juldeh Camara.  

And please note Justin and Juldeh will be performing right here in Birmingham the day after tomorrow at the mac, in Edgbaston, in the open air arena.  That’s going to be a real treat indeed!  I saw them a couple of weeks ago down in Devon at the HOME Festival doing an acoustic set - a real mindblower!  

Juldeh is from Gambia in West Africa and is a real virtuoso on the ritti or nyanyeru (the traditional one-string fiddle of West Africa).  Doesn’t sound very inspiring?  Trust me, this guy really knows what he’s doing!  Amazing licks and he can make it sound like lots of different instruments too - all on just ONE string and no fretboard!!  He also sings really well and has real presence.  

Justin’s no slouch either - he’s served time with Jah Wobble and has also produced and co-written with Robert Plant.  Justin plays some mean blues guitar and banjo and sings too.  

If you want to hear where the blues comes from, where the Gambia meets the Mississippi, where West Africa meets the Celtic World, then check these guys out.  Highly recommended!  

So that’s this Friday at the mac (7.30pm and the support band is the African Roots Fusion Band)

OK, so here’s a taster for that - a laidback bluesy piece called “Halanam”

9 “Halanam” (7:09) by JuJu (Justin Adams & Juldeh Camara) from the album “In Trance”  (Real World Records)

So, from the ethereal sound of the one-string fiddle to the simultaneously ‘in-yer-face’ but ‘so-laid-back-it’s-almost-horizontal’ sounds of afrobeat-funk band Ikebe Shakedown from Brooklyn, New Yoik!  Love their sound! 

And that cowbell!  That’s exactly how I’d play it too . . . Hmmmm!  Not so much ‘music in the key of life’ as ‘groove to the universal pulse’. 

This is the “Kumasi Walk” from their album also called ”Ikebe Shakedown” on the Ubiquity label.

10 “Kumasi Walk” (4:42) by Ikebe Shakedown from the album “Ikebe Shakedown” (Ubiquity)

OK, WAKEY-WAKEY!! Balkanbeat madness to the max! This is “Marock” by Shazalakazoo

11 “Marock” (3:54) by Shazalakazoo

[CONTINUOUS]

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12 “Moon Monkeys” (1:15) by Professor Elemental from the album “More Tea (Remixes)” (Tea Sea Records)

[CONTINUOUS]

13 “Prokofiev” (3:20) by Slamboree

I bet that cleared yer sinuses out!  OK first of all in that little medley you heard a modern piece of Balkanbeat madness from Shalakazoo followed by a little interlude of Professor Elemental lunar monkey business and then, no it’s not those tossers from The Apprentice - it is of course the Russian genius Prokofiev’s “Dance of the Knights” from Romeo and Juliet - given a peculiarly British Dubstep treatment by Slamboree, a collective that includes Rhubarb Radio and  Birmingham’s very own DJ Marc Reck (AKA DJ Narrative).  

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So in true WorldBeatUK fashion, from the ridiculous to the sublime...

From the 1980s a glorious fusion of Andalusian flamenco with a Moroccan orchestra - Juan Pena El Lebrijano and the Orquesta Andalusi de Tanger

I first bought this album “Encuentros” on vinyl and fell in love with the album sleeve, the rather dapper looking silk-cravatted Paco Cepero on guitar, the open-shirted, medallion-chested singer Juan Pena El Lebrijano both seated in front, and behind them two Moroccan women and five blokes in neck-to-ankle pure white shifts and - joy of joys - each one wearing a red fez!  It was better than a Tommy Cooper convention! 

Aah, but you think I jest too much methinks!  Let me tell you however the music is fabulous!  Here’s the opening tune from the album.  It’s called “Vivir Un Cuento De Hadas” (living a fairytale) and I think you’ll see what I mean

14 “Vivir Un Cuento De Hadas” (5:08) by Juan Pena Lebrijano and the Orquesta Andalusi de Tanger from the album “Encuentros” (Ariola)

[CHANGE THE CDS OVER!]

Wasn’t that sumptuous!  Ok, let’s take it up again a notch.  This is a cumbia-based track with a reggaeton feel and andean folkloric overtones mixed with hip-hop; originally written by the Argentine band Karamelo Santo and featured in the Latin American film “Caño Dorado”; here it’s remixed by Goy Karamelo (now a solo musician).  I’m really loving some of the stuff that’s been coming out of Argentina recently and this is no exception.  “Que No Digan Nunca”

(1) 15   “Que No Digan Nunca” [Ends at 3.48] (4:03) by Karamelo Santo (Caño Dorado film music - remix by Goy Karamelo) from the album “Mi CD”

[BEWARE: Ends at 3.48!!]

OK, two in a row now; same song but for some reason with different names.  I’ll tell you after, what the details are, but if any of you say Lily Allen I’ll never talk to you again!

(2) 16   “Reggae Merengue” (2:16) by Tommy McCook & The Supersonics

And now another version . . .

(3) 17   “Cójeme La Caña” (3:00) by Pedro Laza Y Sus Pelayeros (Mixticius)

So, first one was an old version by Jamaican saxophonist Tommy McCook and the Supersonics called - for some bizarre reason on the version I’ve got - ‘Reggae Merengue’ (although it’s obviously a cumbia to me!) and that was followed by the Colombian bandleader Pedro Laza y sus Pelayeros and the same tune but called “Cójeme La Caña” - and that was a remix by Mixticius; you can find more of his work on Soundcloud.

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Well, a real treat now - I absolutely love this!  From the “Gilles Peterson in Africa - The Soul” album this is South African singer Letta Mbulu and some tasty, tasty funk called “Mahlalela”.  Brilliant!

(4) 18   “Mahlalela” (4:45) by Letta Mbulu from the album “Gilles Peterson in Africa - The Soul” (Ether)

[CONTINUOUS]

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(5) 19   “Original Cumbiamuffin” (4:57) by Supa Bassie

Ha ha ha!  Love that one!! That was reggaeman Supa Bassie from Valencia and a tune called “Original Cumbiamuffin” - a cumbia reworking of his hit “Original Raggamuffin” from the “Crónicas de un Viaje” album.

And since I’m in that remixing mood how about this little mashup from young Mexican mixer Outsider8301 - this is Sidestepper’s groovalicious “Papaya” vs Wreckx-n-Effect’s 1992 butt-wobbling “Rumpshaker”, with a little MIA thrown in for good measure.  You can start bouncing now ladies!

(6) 20   “Papaya vs Rumpshaker” (5:29) by Wreckx + M.I.A. vs Sidestepper (Oscar Outsider 8301)

[Talk over intro to next track]:

OK, we’re definitely in the groove now, brothers and sisters!  And time to lay this one on you. This is where latin meets soul, meets jazz meets funk.  Eddie Palmieri is both a giant and a living legend in  the annals of New York latin jazz and here his amazing “Mi Congo Te Llama” gets a very liberal deconstruction by Joaquin “Joe” Claussell from the brand new album “Hammock House - Africa Caribe” on the Fania label.  7 minutes of stone-solid groove, babies!

[BEWARE - LONG QUIET START!!]

(7) 21   “Mi Congo Te Llama” (Joe Claussell Remix) (6:59) by Eddie Palmieri from the album “Hammock House - Africa Caribe” (Código/Fania)

OK and that’s the end of the show . . . 

[SHOUT-OUTS TO ALL AND ANNOUNCEMENTS - reminder about Justin and Juldeh at mac]

I said at the top of the show that tonight was all about the funk and the soul, the grist and the groove.  Well, I’ve tried to give you that tonight and I hope you agree.  If you don’t feel so, then at least you should be able to with this final track. 

This is the fantastic Jocelyn Brown and Nuyorican Soul and a track from the Masters At Work album “Nuyorican Soul”.  Turn up your speakers as loud as they’ll go and say after me: “It’s Alright, I Feel it!”

(8) 22   “It’s Alright, I Feel It!” (3:22) by Jocelyn Brown & Nuyorican Soul from the album “NuYorican Soul” (Talkin Loud)

WorldBeatUK (18th Show) - Broadcast Notes (29/6/11)

Tagged with: WorldBeatUK Glyn Phillips Mabon HOME Festival Dartington Thomas Brooman WOMAD WOMEX Fernhill Phil Stanton Rough Guide Coope Boyes Simpson Ian King Professor Elemental Uxia Ceu Seckou Keita Rory McLeod Farka Toure B B King Legouix Max Pashm Zeca Pegadinho

WBUK18 (29/6/11) - SHOWNOTES

WorldBeatUK 7-9pm this evening: Some folkin' good Folk with some folking good folkers, string driven things with veritable kings of African kora and a genuine King of Blues, Galician cuckoos, Brazilian café, Balkan Pashm, Sunflowers from Lola, a cracking Cuban big band, some very Rude Love from Mexico and a gentlemanly tannophile & his orang-utan butler . . .

1 “Intro-Mat” (1:47) by Matchatcha from the album “Nyekesse” (Melodie)

Welcome to the show and first off: Happy 7th Birthday to my youngest son, Lewys! Hope you’re having a lovely day! And if it’s a birthday that must mean a party! So without further ado, let’s join Welsh folkers Mabon for a Schindig!

2 “Schindig” (5:00) by Mabon from the album “Live at the Grand Pavilion”

Yeah that was the Welsh based Mabon - one of the most exciting folk bands on the UK circuit at the moment - I had the pleasure of seeing them last year at the Womex conference in Copenhagen and that was a tune called “Schindig” off their Award Winning album “Live at the Grand Pavilion” released last year. The newly reformed Jamie Smith’s Mabon will be playing at Womad in Charlton Park in about four weeks time on the BBC Radio 3 stage. So catch them if you can.

And from one Festival to another. I’ve recently come back from a brilliant small festival in Devon called the HOME festival which took place at Dartington Hall in Devon over one and a half days. It was co-founded by Thomas Brooman - one of the original founders of Womad - alongside a chap called simply Drum.

The idea behind the HOME festival is to try and present top-flight world music acts in a more intimate setting and in particular to present at least half of the performances completely acoustically. And when I say acoustic - I mean just that: NO amplification whatsoever! Hard to believe? Trust me it worked!

The venue was a 14th century hall in an old manor house and for many of the bands it was their very first time performing without mikes and speakers etc - but it was a resounding success. The audience needed to be silent but it was amazing how quickly everybody adapted.

And one of the bands who performed like this were the Welsh folk band “Fernhill”. Believe me, a great band to see live - the delicacy of the pieces, the seeming simplicity of the delivery, the strength of the arrangements all combined into a breathtaking concert. I’ve got to big up the voice of Julie Murphy in particular - in this large, incredibly high medieval hall her voice took on an almost 3-dimensional quality and took flight above our heads.

So here’s a flavour of Fernhill. This is from their album "Canu Rhydd" (which roughly translates as freeform poetry) and is a track called "Diddan". Oh and a big thank you to Jane Brace and Katrina Hurford of Dartington for looking after me and my brother - looking forward to next year already.

3 “Diddan” (5.53) by Fernhill from the album “Canu Rhydd”

and from Welsh Folk to English Folk...

Whilst at Home Festival I met Phil Stanton, the boss of World Music Network (the people that put out the Rough Guide series of CD - and “Introducing…”) . There are two new CDs from the RG range, to be released …when?…. - English Folk and Brazilian Cafe.

Explain concept of RG and of the bonus CDs.

I’m going to deal with the folk album first coz we’re still in the British folk section of tonight’s show. This track is actually from the bonus CD which comes free with the RG TO EF - and is a compilation devoted to the work of Yorkshire acapella singers Coope, Boyes & Simpson.

- explain about Jerusalem and Froots etc.

This is a short piece called “Uttoxeter Souling Song”

4 “Uttoxeter Souling Song” (1.18) by Coope, Boyes & Simpson from the album “RG To English Folk” (Network)

From main album: explain when I first heard this tune (early 80s - Sheffield, Oscar The Frog etc, …

5 “Adieu to Old England” (4.41) by Ian King from the album “RG To English Folk (Network)

Link from saying goodbye to Old England to the Prof and his quest for the golden frog.

remind people of Prof’s website www.professorelemental.com and that the remix album “More Tea” is due out on Monday July 4th

6 “The Quest for the Golden Frog” (Tom Caruana remix) (3.49) by Professor Elemental from the album “More Tea (Remixes)

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[CONTINUOUS]

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7 “O Cuco a Cantar” (3.26) by Uxia (with Fred Martins) from the album “Meu Canto” (do Fol Musica)

Explain about Uxia - then Brazilian connection, into the second of WM Network’s Rough Guides - Brazilian Café (concept about café)

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8 “Comadi” (3.33) by Céu from album “RG to Brazilian Café” (Network)

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Mention Home Festival again. . . and Seckou 50% of sales to Red Cross charity. Explain 'Silimbo'.

9 “Mande Arabe” (6.08) by Seckou Keita Quintet from the album “The Silimbo Passage” (World Artventures)

Flag up Rory McLeod at the Kitchen Garden Café - Sunday 3rd July - Rory McLeod - Kitchen Garden Cafe, 17 York Road, KH, Bham (World Unlimited) 7.30pm

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Here’s what I said about RORY MCLEOD a few weeks ago, worth repeating:
“He carries with him that same mixture of idiosyncracy and integrity as people like Ash Mandrake, Roy Harper etc.  I think it’s safe to say that Rory is an underground legend.  Described variously as an amazing folk artist, traveller, troubadour extraordinaire and a one-man folk orchestra, Rory plays a multitude of instruments including trombone, harmonica, spoons, djembe, bandorea, guitar, finger-cymbals and tapshoe-driven stomp-box!  He’s played and recorded with people like Ani Di Franco, Taj Mahal, Kathryn Tickell and Ali Farka Toure amongst many others.

I had the pleasure of performing with him back in the 90s right here in Birmingham - a great musician, and a true gent to boot.  Luckily for us here in Brum he’s come down from the Orkneys and will be performing on Sunday 3rd July at the Kitchen Garden Café, Kings Heath, courtesy of World Unlimited

I urge you to go along - you will be drawn into his unique world and emerge with your senses buzzing.”

10 “Going Song” (5.52) by Rory McLeod from the album “Travelling Home” (Cooking Vinyl)

Here’s Rory with Ali Farka Toure:

11 “Roucky” (8:19) by Ali Farka Touré from the album “The Source”

The Source = the source of the blues and here’s how most of us remember the blues - BB King and the “Thrill is Gone”

12 “The Thrill is Gone” (4:58) by B.B.King from the album “The Best Of Blues”

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Back to Africa and Ali Farka Toure - combined with the King of Kora, Toumani Diabate - the last album they recorded together ...

13 ”Sabu Yerkoy” (4:09) by Ali Farka Touré & Toumani Diabaté from the album “Ali & Toumani” (World Circuit)

FLAG UP: Monday 4th July - Vieux Farka Toure - UK release, new album “The Secret” on Six Degrees Records

14 “The Secret“ (6:51) by Vieux Farka Touré from the album “The Secret”

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[CHANGE THE CD!!]

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Change of mood and pace - leave Africa and come back to the UK - explain about Alexandra and her fusion stuff - here more latiny

(1) 15 “Time to Go” (3:33) by Alexandra Legouix & the Sunflowers from the album “Lola”

Flag up SUBVERT at the W&H: this Saturday 2nd July- Johnny Kowalski and the Sexy Weirdos (Balkan Gypsy with brass and fiddle, and the Damnbusters (Ska Classics), Lobster (Ska/punk, Sam Maloney (acoustic) plus DJs… 8 til late (£2 b4 10pm / £4).

Balkan bit leads into Max Pashm (& replug Home Fest)

(2) 16 “Manea K” (4.47) by Max Pashm from the album “Never Mind the Balkans”

[CONTINUOUS]

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(3) 17 “Gettin Down” (3.06) by The Brand New Rhythm from the album “Let’s Boogaloo Vol 3”

Last one just a bit of fun - no plugs to do for the rest of the night; so over to Brazil first for Zeca Pagodinho and his song “Vai Vadiar” which roughly translates as ‘going astray’.

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(4) 18 “Vai Vadiar” (4.07) by Zeca Pagodinho from the album “Serie Sem Limite” ()

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(5) 19 “Rude Love” (4.57) by Althea & Donna vs Rihanna (Outsider 8301 remix)

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[SHOUTOUTS, thank yous, announcements, etc]

Happy Birthday to Lewys!

(6) 20 “Tumbao a Peruchin” (4.40) by Alfredo Rodriguez from the album “Cuba Linda” (Hannibal / Rykodisc 1996)

WorldBeatUK (17th Show) - Broadcast Notes (22/6/11)

Tagged with: WorldBeatUK Glyn Phillips Calan Tom Martin Cheka Aly Keita Tamikrest SMOD Manu Chao Super Cayor Hakim Ghazi Abdel Baki Charbel Rouhana Fareeq Al Atrash Awati˝as Professor Elemental Swing Gadje Antwerp Gypsy Ska Ot Azoy Tirana Caravana Fantasma Canteca

 WBUK17 (22/6/11) - SHOWNOTES

1 “Intro-Mat” (1.47) by Matchatcha from album “Nyekesse” (Melodie)

Welcome once again to WorldBeatUK on Rhubarb Radio with me Glyn Phillips taking you on a musical journey for the next two hours around the planet’s musical hotspots!   

This week we start in the UK but then travel to West Africa to visit Guinea, Cote D’Ivoire, Mali and Senegal.  

We take in stops at France via San Antonio, Texas, straddle the straits of Gibraltar with a foot in both Morocco and Spain, cruise the Med and then disembark for an extended stay in Lebanon, 

We scale the Andes of Bolivia, gatecrash an English summer fete, head off to the continent to visit the Gypsy and Jewish cultures of France, Belgium and Holland, and even re-imagine Coventry in the metropoli of South America . . .

. . . and finally party off into the sunset in Spain and New York.  I hope you’ve packed your passport and some clean underwear!

Kicking off the show we’re making a hop, skip and a jump from Brum to Wales.  One of the leading bands of the Celtic folk renaissance amongst young musicians is Calan.  This is from their album “Bling” (on the Sain label) and it’s a track called “Calan”.

2 “Calan” (3.33) by Calan from the album “Bling” (Sain)

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Now this weekend you can catch one of Birmingham’s finest sing-songwriters, Tom Martin, who hails originally from Ireland but has put his roots down in Brum - so much so that he owns and runs his own live music venue, the excellent “Tower of Song” on Pershore Road South, in Cotteridge, South Birmingham.  

He’ll be performing there this Saturday 25th June, singing his own beautifully crafted songs and accompanied by the wonderful cellist Helena Rosewell.  Tom’s a mean guitarist too - a man truly at one with his instrument.  

It’s only £3 on the door, runs from around 8pm till midnight and there’ll be a support act beforehand - it’s always a lovely atmosphere there too.  Well worth checking out.  Here’s an idea of what you can expect from Tom and Helena.  This is a track called “Slowburner” from Tom’s solo album “Prime Time”:

3 “Slowburner” (3.07) by Tom Martin from the album “Prime Time” (Tom Martin Music)

Beautiful!

Last week I played you some music from African exiles in Canada and the States.  This time it’s the turn of Guinean singer Cheka Katenen Dioubate who now lives amongst the snows of Canada.  This is a track from her album “Dielilou” entitled “Diagne”.  Cheka describes it thus: "Being alone can be painful, but distance cannot change the power of true love.  The mere sound of a lover's voice can feel like his kiss".

4 “Diagne” (5.02) by Cheka Katenen Dioubate from the album “Dielilou” (Tamala KCD29081)

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Another African resident in a foreign country is the Ivorian musician Aly Keita who plays the balafon - a large wooden marimba-like instrument common in West Africa.  Aly now lives in Belgium, but his music evokes timeless images of Africa.  Here he teams up with the legendary balafonist Keletegui Diabate for a track off his album “Farafinka” (on the Contre Jour label).  This is called “Bamana Folie”:

5 “Bamana Folie” (5.56) by Aly Keita (ft Keletegui Diabate) from the  album “Farafinka” (Contre Jour CJ026)

I’ve featured a lot of Malian artists recently, including this next band, and with good reason.  We’re all finally waking up to the rich diversity of sounds and traditions and great musicianship within this huge country.  

Tamikrest are from northern Mali, where the forests and plains to the south give way to the southern Sahara desert.  They are ethnically Tuareg and their music reflects that - although combined with the rock influences so prevalent amongst the younger Tuareg. 

You can see them this weekend right here in the UK!  They’ll be performing at the “Home Festival” of world music in Dartington, Devon this Saturday - I’m going to cover the festival and I hope to bring back some great music from there for the show.  This track is called “Arantane N Tinariwen” from their new album “Toumastin” (Glitterhouse Records).

6 “Arantane N Tinariwen” (3.47) by Tamikrest from the album “Toumastin” (Glitterhouse Records GRCD 721)

And from Malian desert rock to Malian rap.  SMOD are a group made up of three young rappers and musicians called Sam, Ousco and Donsky.  Originally there was another one, with the initial ‘M’, hence SMOD: S-M-O-D.  

Anyway the ex-Radio Bemba performer Manu Chao just happened to be producing the 2005 album “Dimanche a Bamako” by Amadou & Mariam - when he discovered the youngsters jamming on the rooftop of the house.  It turned out that one of them was Amadou & Mariam’s son Sam.  Manu Chao was so impressed that he produced this, their third album called simply “SMOD”.  

They sing in both French and Bambara and their sweet sound often disguises some hard-hitting issues such as this track: “Dirigeants Africaines” which is aimed at corrupt and incompetent African leaders - “Wordy speakers, money eaters, African leaders are like this”

7 “Dirigeants Africains” (3.59) by SMOD from their album “SMOD” (Because Music)

And it’s only right that we acknowledge Manu Chao himself - but as ever with a twist.  This is a remix by Sonora of one of Manu’s iconic tracks “Bongo Bong” - this is called King of the Bongo”.

8 “King of the Bongo” (5.04) by Manu Chao (Sonora Remix)

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[CONTINUOUS]

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9 “Xamsa Bopp” (4.15) by Super Cayor de Dakar from the album “African Salsa” (Earthworks)

That last track was a load of Mbalax wasn’t it? No, really it was!  M-B-A-L-A-X, mbalax.  The track was called “Xamsa Bopp” by the Senegalese band Super Cayor de Dakar from the 2006 compilation album “African Salsa” on the Earthworks label.  Lovely!

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Hakim - full name Abdelhakim Bouromane - is a Moroccan-Spaniard singer, born in Casablanca, now resident in Malaga in Andalusia.  Hakim mixes pop, flamenco and arabic music and sings and writes in both Spanish and Arabic, as on this track from his double-platinum 1998 album “Como Suena” (How’s It Sound) - this track is called “Nur Lain” but is more popularly referred to by its hookline “Habibi”.

10 “Nur Lain (Habibi) (4.11) by Hakim from the album “Como Suena” (Sony Epic)

Staying in an arabic mood now we’re going to travel around the other side of the Mediterranean, from Spain and Morocco, eastwards to the Levant and in particular to the country of Lebanon where the next three tracks come from, each one very different, but each one produced by Ghazi Abdel Baki and is on the Forward record label.  

And first up is the composer, arranger, guitarist and singer himself, Ghazi Abdel Baki.  This is a track from his 2009 album “The Last Communiqué”.  The whole album is full of great ideas and interesting sounds. Abdel takes all kinds of influences and puts them into his tracks - you can hear pure funk and jazz, classical and filmscore, rock and blues all blended into music that is still very Levantine and Arabic too.  

The track I've selected is called “Majnoun Leyla”.  It's based on the legend of Macnun and Leyla of two star-crossed lovers whose families start feuding with each other (sound familiar?) and eventually when Leyla is married off to someone else Mecnun goes mad and wanders about the desert writing poetry until he dies young as does Leyla. Some stories have them dying together, others being buried together and others as them running off together to live in a village in Rajasthan.

The epic story is based on a real life 7th century Bedouin poet Qays ibn al-Mulawwah who fell in love with a certain Layla bint Mahdi ibn Sah'd.   The tale was made famous five centuries later by the great Persian poet Nizami.  And improbable as this might sound it resonates today because Leyla is the very same woman that appears in Derek and the Dominos (aka Eric Clapton)’s love song “Layla” - the woman who epitomises the forbidden and impossible love.  You see, you learn something new every day!

11 “Majnoun Leyla” (3.36) by Ghazi Abdel Baki from the album “The Last Communiqué” (Forward)

Still in Lebanon an oud duet by Charbel Rouhana and Elie Khouri from Gharbel’s meditative labour of love “Doux Zen” an album which took him 3 years to finish.   It's also, like the previous track, an album steeped in Arabic passion.  As the liner notes by Marcel Khalife say:

 "Charbel  ... passionately surrenders to the lust of the plectrum and fingers, deeply thrusts himself into the Oud's chest ... a melting resonance where boundaries between the pluck and melody intermingle on the verge of a velvety string, like the body of a woman touched by love ... fingers fall and fondle them, then with the edge of the sharp plectrum, embrace, wound and devour them."  

Ooh er, missus!  Now then if you don’t know, the oud is an Arabic stringed instrument with 5 pairs of strings and a fat bulging body like a large gourd chopped in half from the top to the bottom.  Unlike the electric guitar which is unashamedly male, the curvaceous oud along with the Spanish guitar are seen as very much female in character, to be caressed and stroked in order to coax forth the sweet melodies . . .

I’m currently playing in a band called ‘Flamenco Conspiracy’ where we use the oud alongside Spanish guitar, so I’m getting into this great instrument in a big way.  This track is called “Basma”.

12 “Basma” (3.53) by Charbel Rouhana from the album “Doux Zen” (Forward)

And finally before we leave Lebanon here’s a track from the younger generation of Lebanese musicians who, like so many young people around the world, are heavily influenced by rap and hip-hop.  This is Fareeq Al Atrash from the album of the same name and a track called “Sharqi”.

13 “Sharqi” (3.39) by Fareeq Al Atrash from the album “Fareeq Al Atrash” (Forward)

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Don’t forget you’re listening to Glyn Phillips and WorldBeatUK, right here on Rhubarb Radio, transmitting from the Custard Factory in Digbeth, Birmingham all over the world.  Join me every Wednesday between 7pm and 9pm UK time for 2 hours of the best in world music from the four corners of the globe - yes, I know it’s technically impossible, but it makes for a good phrase doesn’t it . . . !

OK, Imagine we’re going whizzing over the Med, over the Atlantic Ocean, over the Amazon Jungle and up the Andes, higher and higher, above the clouds to the Bolivian altiplano where we will find the Aymara people from the lands around Lake Titicaca.  

This next track is not a recent one, there’s no re-issue, no tour, no normal reason for it to appear on radio, apart from the fact that I rather like it and I think you might too.  Going back in the 80s and early 90s you might have heard this sort of music a lot more, but (like East European polyphonic choirs) it seems to have gone our of fashion.  No matter, I don’t give a stuff about fashion.  

The group is called Awatiñas and this track is from their album “El Inka Atahuayllpa” (named after the most famous of the Inca kings).  The sub-title to the album is the catchily named Aymara phrase: “Wiñaypachjakapxañanakasakipunirakiwa” (try saying that after 3 bowls of chicha!), which translates as ‘we will live forever’; I knew that Aymara phrasebook would come in useful somewhere!

There are many different indigenous rhythms and music forms in Bolivia, let alone South America and this one is a ‘saya’, which is often associated with Bolivian carnavales and in particular the Caporal dance.  I’ve seen this danced in the streets of La Paz - the highest capital in the world - at the Festival of Gran Poder and it’s quite a sight!  This track is set in the coca-growing regions of Las Yungas on the side of the Andes where they drop down towards the Amazon jungle and it’s called “En Los Cocales”.

(1) 14 “En Los Cocales” (3.24) by Awatiñas from the album “El Inka Atahuayllpa”

Now, latin americans are world-famous for throwing carnivals and fiestas, aren’t they?  But this is how we do it in England.  And as yesterday was the Summer Solstice, the longest day in the year (yes, check it out!) I’ll leave you with the idiosyncratic Professor Elemental as he takes a little walk around the vicar’s lawn and prepares for the annual village fete.  No, please, this is no laughing matter, in fact: It’s a “Fete Worse Than Death”!

(2) 15 “Fete Worse Than Death” (2.18) by Professor Elemental from the album “More Tea?”

I say, wouldn’t catch those damned Frenchies putting on something so quintessentially English, What?!  No, they’d probably mix it up in a gypsy-stylee with a little bit of Arab funny business, if you’ll pardon my French . . .

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(3) 16 “Kriss Romani” (4.32) by Swing Gadje from album “Rough Guide to Gypsy Swing” (Rough Guide)

That was a track called “Kriss Romani” by the band Swing Gadje from the compilation album “Rough Guide to Gypsy Swing” (Rough Guide label).  And let’s keep with the gypsy mood - but this time moving north from France to Belgium and the Antwerp Gypsy Ska Orchestra this is called “Duj Sandala”.

(4) 17 “Duj Sandala” (3.51) by Antwerp Gypsy Ska Orchestra

Going North again, but just a short distance to Amsterdam where we’ll find the Ot Azoj Klezmer Band and their Molvanian rendition of “Disco Katala”.

(5) 18 “Disco Katala” (4.20) by Ot Azoy Klezmer Band

Nah, I aint finished with the whole gypsy-cum-klezmer-cum balkan thing yet!  And I think it’s time to chuck in a  little cumbia seasoning too.  This is the band La Tirana Caravana and the Add On De Bass remix of “Fanfarri Cumbia”.

(6) 19 “Fanfarri Cumbia” (3.17) by La Tirana Caravana (Add on de Bass remix)

Now then 30 years ago this week back in 1981, a tune was released by a Coventry band that almost more than any other caught the zeitgeist of the time.  A harsh, rightwing Conservative Government, massive unemployment, stagnant economy, discontent, anger, violence, poverty and the breakdown of society whilst a certain grocer’s daughter told us “There is no such thing as Society”. 
  
Businesses were going under, shopfronts were all boarded up, inequality was rife, racial tensions were at breaking point, the inner cities were rioting, and everything seemed bleak.  The band was The Specials.  And the song?   

The spectral, haunting “Ghost Town”.   In recognition of an iconic piece of music and social history - I give you a remix; this is an Argentine re-imagining of “Ghost Town” by the nu-cumbia pioneers “Fantasma”:

(7) 20 “Ghost Town” (3.23) by Fantasma from the album “Cabeza! 006”

And from some nu-latin music to some nu-flamenco.  From Spain the wonderful Canteca de Macao and a tune from their “Camino de la Vida Entera” album (Warner Music Spain) called “Backstage”.

(8) 21 “Backstage” (3.38) by Canteca de Macao from the album “Camino de la Vida Entera” (Warner Music Spain)

OK, nearly at the end of the show now, so let’s have some fun!   From one of my favourite remixers around (all the way over in Adelaide, Australia) this is Matty Blades’s re-working of Ray Charles’s “I Got a Woman”.

(9) 22 “I Got A Woman” (2.36) by Ray Charles (Matty Blades remix)

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[Shout outs and thankyous and reminders - see separate sheet with events listings]:

From ‘I got a woman’ to a track called “La Mujer Latina” - the latin woman - ¡Ay, que bellas que son!  Pues si eres una latina, esto es para ti mujer!  

From the compilation album “Salsa Selecta: a taste of Nu-Yorican Latin Flavours” on the Nascente label, this is 6 minutes and 15 seconds of pure joy.  Just flow with this tune by the 14-piece all-female band, Latin Fever, produced by Larry Harlow of Fania, as it goes from rumba to latin-rock to samba to salsa before ending in a full-on descarga-style work out on timbales.  I love it!  Enjoy, mi gente, goza, goza! 

(10) 23  “La Mujer Latina” (6.14) by Latin Fever from the album “Salsa Selecta: a taste of Nu-Yorican Latin Flavours” (Nascente)

WorldBeatUK (16th Show) - Broadcast Notes (15/6/11)

Tagged with: WorldBeatUK Glyn Phillips Battlefield Band Rachel Harrington Tanja Tzarovska Perunika Trio Nisos Max Pashm QuinÚ Kerieva Krar Collective Samuel Yirga Krosscolor Sierra Leone Refugee All Stars Cumbancha Brassafrik Barriobeat Saa Andrew Dartington Home

WBUK16 (15/6/11) - SHOWNOTES

1 "Intro-Mat"by Matchatcha from the album "Nyekesse" (Melodie)

Hi there!  You're listening to WorldBeatUK on Rhubarb Radio - I'm Glyn Phillips and I've got two hours of great music lined up for you this evening -including: electroswing from Italy, acapella from Bulgaria, Greco-Turkish fusion from the Czech Republic and americana from, well, America!

There's also a Macedonian chanteuse who sings in English, a British gypsy who sings in Roma, a Portuguese percussionist steeped in Mozambican rhythms,  electrified Ethiopian harp, dancehall reggae from Sierra Leone via Canada, soukous from Sierra Leone via the USA and more latino-balkan fusions than you can shake a brass band at!

If that wasn't enough, I've some drum'n'brass afrofusion from Belgium, wonderful ethiojazz from Addis Abbaba, a focus on the music of South America's only English-speaking country Guyana (both jazz and reggae) and the UK's Ska Cubano and DJ Max Pashm jump aboard the Orient Express!

But before all that, welcome to the show and straight up I’m previewing a forthcoming new album from Scotland’s famous folkers - and torchholders for over four four decades for Caledonian Celtic music - The Battlefield Band.  

The Battlefielders have recently recruited a new member, multi-instrumentalist highlander, Ewen Henderson and is mostly, as you would expect, traditional Scottish folk music.  And very good it is too, although they also do an interesting reinterpretation of an Otis Redding Soul classic, “That’s How Strong My Love Is as well as tunes from Ireland and Brittany.  

The album, called “Line Up” is due to be released on July 25th this year and is on the Temple Records label  This is the opening track - a medley of three tunes: “Raigmore”, “Long Run” and “The Clansmen Mourning”:

2 “Raigmore / Long Run/ The Clansmen Mourning” by the Battlefield Band from album “Line Up”) - www.battlefieldband.co.uk

The term ‘americana’ has gained a lot of credence recently as a catch-all for american folk music both modern and traditional.  And there’s nothing wrong with that; like terms such as ‘world music’ and ‘salsa’ and ‘jazz’, it’s a useful thumbnail label when approaching an unfamiliar and vast musical territory, or equally for beginning to market and promote complex musical and cultural developments to people who otherwise might run a mile.  

Oregon-raised Rachel Harrington’s music can be said to encompass many aspects of ‘americana’ - from traditional folk tunes brought over from Europe and American country laments, to gospel, bluegrass and modern acoustic tales. 

Rachel (who by the way has a loyal following over here in the UK due to her acclaimed live performances and is also a close friend of Lindisfarne’s Rod Clements) sings, plays guitar and also guitjo - yes, that’s right, a guitjo: a cross between a guitar and a banjo!  I actually own one - I can’t play it, but it makes me feel good just knowing I’ve got one!   

This is from her first album “City of Refuge” (Skinny Dennis Records) - a jaunty little tune to get you tapping your feet, called “Truman”.

3 “Truman” by Rachel Harrington from the album “City of Refuge” (Skinny Dennis Records)

Incidentally the album that the last tune was taken from - “City of Refuge” - has been described as “a homage to the people who have slipped through the cracks of modern music: dreamers, thieves, drunkards, sinners and good-old fashioned romantics”.  You can find out more about Rachel Harrington at her website: www.rachelharrington.net.  

Rachel’s got a new album out at the moment called “Celilo Falls” (Skinny Dennis Records) and from that I’ve chosen a track called “House of Cards”:

4 “House of Cards” by Rachel Harrington (Celilo Falls)

Macedonian singer/songwriter, Tanja Tzarovska, released her latest album “No Record of Wrong” last month.  It’s sung entirely in English, has some covers of tunes by people like Nick Drake and Leonard Cohen, etc, but also has elements of East European music floating through it, like a scent caught on the wind.  This track is called simply “Home”.

5 “Home” by Tanja Tzarovska from the album “No Record of Wrong” (Amaris River/Cadiz Music)

To the east of of the mountainous state of Macedonia, lies Bulgaria and from there we come across a wonderful tradition of choral acapella groups - especially all-female ones.  Going back in the 80s and 90s Bulgarian and East European female groups were all the rage in world music circles (think Trio Bulgarka for instance), but you don’t hear them so often now, but here’s your chance to see what all the fuss was about.  

This is a young Bulgarian group called Perunika Trio.  Their name stems from the Slavic god of Thunder, Perun and his beautiful young wife Perunika, so beautiful that the Slavs named the Iris after her.  The Perunika Trio are well named - and that’s all I’m saying on that point.  

Musically, they perform perfect harmonies and hauntingly evocative pieces from the great slavic traditions of Bulgaria, Macedonia and Russia.  The girls are based in London now, but that doesn’t detract from the sonic pictures they create of the great plains, vast forests and mountain ranges of Eastern Europe.  

They are on extensive tour of the UK this Summer so look out for them - I shall be looking forward to hearing them at the HOME Festival at Dartington, Devon (Fri 24th and Sat 25th June).  This is from their album “Introducing… Perunika Trio” and it’s a track called “Rekoh Ti, Tsone”:

6 “Rekoh Ti, Tsone” by the Perunika Trio from the album “Introducing… Perunika Trio” (World Music Network)

And of course, south of Macedonia and Bulgaria lie Greece and Turkey and it’s from here and Asia Minor in general that the next band draw their inspiration.  Nisos are a relatively new band formed originally by clarinettist and composer Nikos Koulouris and percussionist and kaval player Tomas Rossi.  The name Nisos means 'island' in Greek and refers to the physical and cultural isolation of where the band currently resides in the Czech Republic, far away from their homelands.  

However, they carried their passion for the Greek and Byzantine music and culture of Asia Minor with them and have since added lyricist and  vocalist Sofia Prusali as well as members who play bouzouki, saz, ney, oud, bass, and Cretan Lyre and Cretan Lute.  Their professed aim is to speak to the heart by the means of music, regardless of the language.  You be the judge.  This track is called “Piji” from their album “Nisos”:

7 “Piji” by Nisos from the album "Nisos"

A final geographical link now in my Eurasian chain: the engine’s steaming, the luggage is firmly strapped onto the racks and the guard’s got his whistle to his lips!  All aboard!  This is the Night Train to Istambul!!

8 “Istambul (Not Constantinople) (Max Pashm remix) - Ska Cubano - “Ajiaco! the Remix Album”

Well, I enjoyed the ride anyway!  That was a 21st Century version of the 1930s classic “Istanbul (Not Constantinople)”, here performed by Ska Cubano but given a remake-over by veteran British remixer Max Pashm, who I’m also looking forward to seeing at the Home Festival in Devon in a couple of weeks.

Now then, from Portugal, Joaquim Teles aka Quiné is a percussionist and composer.  This next track is from his 2008 debut solo album called “Da Côr Da Madeira” which loosely refers to ‘wood-coloured music’, in which Quiné uses the Timbila (a Mozambican xylophone) amongst other organic woody sounds to take us on a percussive fusion journey from Portugal to Mozambique.  Also on the album are the flautist Paulo Marinho and a quartet of backing vocals.  This is called “Maputos”

9 “Maputos” by Quiné from the album “Da Côr Da Madeira” (Quiné - 2008)


Don’t forget you’re tuned into Rhubarb Radio transmitting from theCustard Factory in Birmingham, England.  My name’s Glyn Phillips and you’re listening to WorldBeatUK a weekly journey around the globe in search of the best in world music and the sorts of sounds you wouldn’t normally come across on the radio.  Don’t forget to join me every Wednesday 7-9pm as I take you around the world in weighty grooves. 

Now, over the last couple of weeks I’ve mentioned the Celebrating Sanctuary Festival to be held in London on 19th June on the South Bank as part of Refugee Week, and I’ve ben playing music from some of the musicians taking part in that.   Well, to round off my focus on that I’ve got a couple of tracks lined up.  

First off is one of the new voices of the UK Roma scene, Kerieva who I understand is of mixed Irish Romany and Manouche gypsy descent.  You can find out more about her and the issues she’s passionate about as well as her music at these two sites: www.kerieva.blogspot.com and www.soundcloud.com/kerieva.  

Kerieva often sings in Romany and this one’s no exception.  It’s from her 2010 album “Stand Aside” on Rala Records and besides Kerieva on vocals, strings, guitar, tacaneo, palmas, harmonium, accordion and Irish harp, the album features Indo-jazzer Arun Ghosh on programming, keys, and clarinet, Rastko Rasic on drums and Dr Das on bass.  This is called “Ceraina” (Chera-INa)


(1)   10 “Ceraina” by Kerieva from the album “Stand Aside” (Rala Records CD001 June 2010)

[CONTINUOUS]

(2)   11 “Gurugenya” by the Krar Collective from the album

And that last track was also by a group playing at the Celebrating Sanctuary Festival in London this weekend, the Krar Collective, originally from Ethiopia and now based in London.  The krar refers to the Ethiopian harp played there by Temesgen Taraken and with the traditional kebero drums played by Amare Mulugeta and vocals by Genet Asefa.  That track was called “Gurugenya”.

And from that funky and electrified, but still quite traditional Ethiopian performance to some right on the money Ethiopian jazz with a dub sensibility.  

This is the excellent young Ethiopian pianist Samuel Yirga, who’s part of the brilliant Dub Colossus who I’m very excited about indeed (and have been booked for this year’s Womad at Charlton Park).  Samuel’s due to release an album in his own name later on in the year called the Habasha Sessions, so here’s a little taster of how it might sound.  This track is called “Habasha Diaspora (Addis Piano Mix)” and I’m majorly loving it!  You’ve been told!

(3)   12 Habasha Diaspora (Addis Piano Mix) by Samuel Yirga

[CONTINUOUS]

(4)   13 “Jazz” by Colgrain Whyte

And from one piece of great ethiopian jazziness to a slice of Guyanese jazz pan heaven.  That last track was by a steelpan jazzman by the name of Colgrain Whyte who hails from Guyana in South America.  

Now Guyana’s one of those countries that many people are not sure where exactly it is or really anything about it.  You could be mistaken for thinking it’s in the Caribbean, but it’s actually far away on the Northeastern coast of South America facing the North Atlantic and sandwiched between Venezuela, Brazil and the former Dutch colony of Suriname.  

But it seems to look towards the English-speaking Caribbean islands rather than it’s Spanish, Portuguese and Dutch-speaking neighbours for cultural influence.  And so soca and reggae are very much in evidence in this large English-speaking outpost as well as indo-guyanese chutney music.

The next track is by Eze Rockliffe also from Guyana and it’s a lovely piece of laid-back reggae from a singer who’s been gently rocking it since the 1970s at least.  This track is called “Suki Bajendo”.

(5)   14 “Suki Bajendo” by Eze Rockliffe

[CONTINUOUS]

(6)   15 “No Love” by Tennicia 

And at the other end of the age range to Eze Rockcliffe, in the last of my trio of Guyanese musical treats, that was the lovely young singer, Tennicia and a reggae number called “No Love”.  

All three of these artists, jazzpan player, Colgrain Whyte, and singers Eze Rockliffe and Tennicia are on Guyana’s own Krosscolor label and agency and you can find out a bit more about them and other artists at www.krosscolor.com.

Ok, ready for some soukous?  But this time from Sierra Leone’s Refugee All Stars.  They’re in the UK at the moment and you can catch them on Sunday 19th June at the Africa Oye Festival in Liverpool and also performing in Hull as part of the Refugee Week celebrations there on Wednesday the 22nd June - that’s if you’re not listening to me on my next show!

This is from their last album “Rise and Shine” on the Cumbancha label and a track called “Tamagbondirsu” - get yer dancing shoes on kids!  It’s time to soukous!!

(7)   16 “Tamagbondorsu” by Sierra Leone’s Refugee All Stars from the album “Rise and Shine” (Cumbancha)

[CONTINUOUS]

(8)   17 “Djamaa” by Brassafrik from the album “Brassafrik” (A-Shams)

That was a track called “Djamaa” by the Belgian-based afro-fusion band Brassafrik from their eponymous album on the A-Shams label.  With a four-piece African percussion core led by the tama and djembe player Babs Jobo and trombonist Stefaan Blancke heading the 6 piece brass section they create explosive skin and horn dance music.  

They’ll also be in the UK this summer - certainly at the Durham International Brass Festival (4-8th July) and you can find out more about them at www.met-x.be

Returning to Sierra Leone for a moment here’s another African refugee making music in a foreign land.  This time it’s Saa Andrew Gbongbor a young singer who fled Sierra Leone, spent time in a refugee camp in Gambia and eventually being rehoused in a small Canadian town in New Brunswick.  

Saa like so many people around the world has been very influenced by the music of Jamaica and prefers to play a form of dancehall reggae.  This is his tune “Butunneh Banda” from the album of the same name.

(9)   18 “Butunneh Banda” by Saa Andrew from the album  (Butunneh Banda)

OK we’re heading into the last furlong of the show, so let’s get the party started!  A couple of tracks by a remixer whose work I’m really loving at the moment.  

This is Rude Hi Fi of Barriobeat fame and a catchy little bit of latinobalkandubrap-ting-and-ting called “Niente Minkia Cacata!” - just grab yourself a dance partner, hold ‘em close, very close and start rocking it, y’hear!

(10)   19 “Niente Minkia Cacata!” (ft Rude Hi Fi & Don Skal by Barriobeat)

[CONTINUOUS]

(11)   20 “Santo Precario” (Balkan Cumbia remix) by Barriokatz/Fat Kat Disco (Barriobeat).

Yeah, yeah, wasn’t that a groove?!  Barriobeat’s Balkan Cumbia remix of “Santo Precario”.

Don’t forget you can hear Brummie Ska band the Heels this Sunday 19th June at the Leamington Peace Festival which is a free one-day festival 11am-6pm at the Pump Rooms in Leamington Spa near Warwick.

This is the last one -  those Italian electro-retro cool-cats Mixer Pirillo and the Sweet Life Society want you to swing it babies!  This is “Artichaut (Chinese Man)”.  Enjoy and see y’all next week!

(12)   21 “Artichaut” (Chinese Man) mixer Pirillo edit by The Sweet Life Society

WorldBeatUK (15th Show) - Broadcast Notes (8th June 2011)

Tagged with: WorldBeatUK Glyn Phillips JuJu Frigg Kadialy Kouyate Gnawa Super Khoumeissa Doa Bonovo Balfa Brothers Timbalada Jušara Maršal Kiki Dinucci Luna Itzel Imam Baildi Goy Karamelo Poly Rythmo Rob Roy Ikebe Shakedown Mixticius Songhai Pedro Laza Strut Analog

WBUK15 (8/6/11) SHOWNOTES

1 “Intro-Mat” (1:47) by Matchatcha from album “Nyekesse” (Melodie)

Hi, this is WorldBeatUK, I’m Glyn Phillips and you’re listening to Rhubarb Radio - coming at you loud and clear from The Custard Factory, Digbeth, Birmingham.   Welcome to the show that brings the sound of a planet to your living room.

Lots of goodies on the show tonight, including: some classic world fusion from the 1980s - courtesy of Ketama, Toumani Diabate and Danny Thompson’s Songhai project. 

Notwithstanding: kora - a  21-string Senegalese harp, gimbri - a 3-string guitar and ritti - a one-string fiddle.

And how can you resist when Michael Jackson goes Cumbia, Pedro Laza goes Swing, and The Big Apple goes Afrobeat.  

As well as all that we’ve got music from Beninese vodoun afrobeat maestros Orchestre Poly-Rhythmo’s last album in 2010 and from their first ever album in 1973, Ghanaian afro-funk from 1977, remixed Greek rembetiko and Serbian hasaposerviko, Mexican waltz, Brazilian rumba & carimbó, samba-reggae from Timbalada, and some classic cajun from the Balfa Brothers. 

Sprinkle all that with Medieval tales of Arthurian romance from Spain’s celtic corner as well as contemporary Galician fusion, traditional Takamba music from northern Mali, Gnawa Sufi trance music from Morocco, and some Nordic fiddling and you’ve got the basis of tonight’s show.

However, I’m going to kick off with a band I played last week called JuJu which includes  English guitarist/composer Justin Adams (who amongst other things was a member of Jah Wobble’s Invaders of the Heart, produced Tinariwen’s first and third albums and co-wrote Robert Plant’s 2005 album) along with the Gambian singer and one-string fiddle player Juldeh Camara (who has previously been part of Ifang Bondi, has played with the Blind Boys of Alabama and also been part of Tunge Jegede’s African Classical Ensemble).  

JuJu also includes Billy Fuller on bass and Dave Smith on drums.  This is from their new album (“In Trance” about to be released on Monday 13th June by Real World Records) and it’s a suitably trance-like blues called “Jombajo”:

2 “Jombajo” (6:58) by JuJu (Justin Adams & Juldeh Camara) from album “In Trance” (Real World Records)

And continuing in a suitably laid-back vein I offer you this piece by the nordic string band Frigg (named after the Scandinavian mother goddess and wife of Odin and incidentally where we get the name of Friday from in English) made up of musicians from Norway and Finland, playing between them four fiddles, mandolin, guitar and bass.  From their album “Grannen”, this is called “Amurin Tiikeri”:

3 “Amurin Tiikeri” (4:53) by Frigg from album “Grannen” (Frigg00007)

As I said last week, the Celebrating Sanctuary Festival 2011 will be taking place in London on the 19th June on the South Bank, as part of Refugee Week (which is the 20th-26th June) and to flag that up I’m featuring some of the artists involved this week and next.  Last week I featured Rory McLeod and this week it’s the turn of Bravo Bravo.  Normally this is a duo formed out of the Trinidadian steel pan maestro Fimber Bravo and the Senegalese kora player, Kadialy Kouyate.  

This next track is from their album “Small Talk”; however it features just Kadialy on his own on one of his own compositions called “Kilonding” (which means ‘orphan’).  The song tells how shortly after giving birth to a son a mother is killed by the King Manfati when she is caught stealing his water.  Years later the son goes from village to village searching for the king to take his revenge . . .

4 “Kilonding” (4:22) by Kadialy Kouyate  from BravoBravo’s album “Small Talk”

We’re going to go North from Southern Senegal, past Gambia and North Senegal, Mauretania, and Western Sahara to Morocco, where we find the Gnawa musicians of Essaouira.   The Gnawa follow a branch of mystical sufi Islam that also incorporates elements of much older West African divinity.  

The Gnawa musicians are famous for practising healing rituals and holding ceremonies on the night of the Leela which involve deeply hypnotic trance music led by a master musician or ‘maallem’ and his troupe, assisted by a ‘moqadeema’ female healer, to the melodies of the 3-stringed gimbri, the clapping of hands driving the rhythm forward, the rising and falling chants and the relentless clash of the ‘krakeb’ (the large metal castanets).

In this recording - made during one such healing session in 2003, you can hear the maallem Mokhtar Gania and his ensemble performing “Arrahb Alahmar Essaouria”, part of a much longer piece called “Sidi Hamou”, which represents the butcher who leads the sacrifice, his colour being, of course, blood-red . . .

5 “Arrahb Alahmar Essaouria” (3:14) by Maallem Mokhtar Gania from album Gnawa “Sufi Trance - Music Of Morocco”  (Standard Records)

[BEWARE!! ENDS ABRUPTLY!  FADE after 3 mins ie about 15 secs before end]

And from one trance-like piece to another - this is Super Khoumeissa a group of six musicians and four dancers from Gao on the banks of the River Niger in Northern Mali.  They’ve been around in various formats for around 20 years but this is their first official release.  The music they play is known as Takamba (the commonest musical form in Northern Mali) and refers also to the graceful dance which accompanies it.  Super Khoumeissa play the heavily amplified three-stringed tahardent, also known as the ngoni (and also very similar to the gimbri of the previous track) alongside huge calabash gourds which they strike a bit like the Indian ghatam pot and are fronted by a female singer, Zerena Maiga.

This track is from a 12” Limited Edition album on the FatCat Records label called “Split Series No 21” due to be released on the 21st of August this year.  It’s called the Split Series because they share the album with the LA based vocal and percussion quartet Foot Village who will be touring the UK this July (including Brum’s Hare and Hounds).  We’ll have to wait a bit to see Super Khoumeissa who should be accompanying the singer Khaira Arby, but in the meantime this is a track by them called “Khoumeissa”.

6 “Khoumeissa” (6:32) by Super Khoumeissa from album “Split Series #21” (FatCat Records)

[FADE AROUND 2-3 mins max!!]

OK, so far tonight I’ve played a rather laid-back show - which is fine, it’s good to take time to listen to stuff that I could never play in a club situation.  So here’s one more reflective piece, before I start to change the gears musically speaking.  This is from a new release on the Spanish Fol Musica label (part of the bigger Boa Music España group) which specialises in the music of the Galicia region of North-Western Spain.  

Followers of this show will have heard me play plenty of music from this vibrant Celtic region, both traditional and contemporary fusion.  So I’ve got two tracks lined up to represent both ends of the musical arc there.  

First up is the group Doa who have been around for over 30 years now and tend towards exploring the traditional and ancient musical history of Galicia.  They’ve just released a new album called “A Fronda dos Cervos” (The Horns of the Deer) which is entirely devoted to medieval Galician poetry set to music.  No don’t run away!  It’s good, honestly!  This track is based upon the breton lays which deal with the Arthurian legends - in this case the story of Sir Tristan the Irish king Malhout.  This track is called “O Maroot”.

7 “O Maroot” (3:28) by DOA from album “A Fronda Dos Cervos” (Fol Musica)

And now the other side of Galician folk music - some fusion from the trio Bonovo - which incidentally was formed by the zanfoñeiro Oscar Fernandez, one of the current members of the last band we just heard, Doa.  Oscar plays the zanfoña - a galician hurdy-gurdy - and this is teamed up with accordion and drums and samplers to create a sort of electro-acoustic dancefloor folk reminiscent of early Afro-Celt Sound System, but with a more defined Galician sound.  

The track is called “Sexta”, from the self-titled album “Bonovo” (also on the Spanish Fol Musica label).  It’s like a cross between folk-rock, prog-rock and jazz-fusion - and there’s absolutely nothing wrong with that in my book!

8 “Sexta” (4:03) by Bonovo from album “Bonovo” (Fol Musica)

Well, we’ve had lots of fiddlers already on tonight’s show and this next one is no exception.  It’s not a new band or even a new album - I’m just playing this for the sheer love of it - this is for Dylan coz I know he loves cajun music:  The Balfa Brothers from Mamou, Louisiana and the “Acadien Two Step”.  

9 “Acadien Two Step” (3:09) by Balfa Brothers from album “World of Music Sampler” (Nascente)

Don’t forget you’re listening to WorldBeatUK right here on Rhubarb Radio, transmitting from Birmingham right across the world!  If you’ve got an internet connection then we can reach you!  My name’s Glyn Phillips and you can join me every Wednesday (7pm-9pm UK time) on a musical journey around the world.  

Now, it’s very strange that even though I’ve spent various months in Brazil going back and I was a founder member of various Brazilian music ensembles in Birmingham from the late 80s onwards that I haven’t played a lot of music from there on this show.  Well let’s try and redress the balance a bit - though as ever with a bit of a twist.  

This next track is from samba-reggae giants Timbalada and one of my favourite numbers of theirs “Beija-Flor” (Hummingbird).  Of course with me I always like to put a different slant on things - so this is Timbalada remixed with some ragga lyrics in English (possibly by someone called ‘British Bulldog’ - I just can’t tell, I’ve tried to track it down but to no avail - if you know the answer, contact me); I have no other details apart from it’s taken from the 2000 album “Brazil: The Essential Album” (on the Manteca label):

10 “Beija-Flor” (5:02) by Timbalada from album “Brazil: The Essential Album (Disc 2)” (Manteca)

[CONTINUOUS]

11 “Engasga Gato/Casa Barata” (3:26) by Juçara Marçal e Kiko Dinucci from album “Padê” 

OK, that jaunty samba track was by the Brazilian paulistino duo of Juçara Marçal and Kiko Dinucci from their debut album “Padê” (which is a Yoruba word which means ‘finding’ and also refers to the opening ceremony of a candomble session where the first orixa to be called is always Exu the messenger). The track was a mixture of rumba and carimbó made from the medley of two songs “Engasga Gato” and “Casa Barata”.

And from one giant nation of Latin America to another - ¡OYEN!  Sres y Sras - vamo’ a Mexico!  Sí, Sr.  ¿Cómo no?  Dele por ‘echo…  Llamando a todo’ lo mexicano’ y las mexicanas - desde Tijuana a Cancún - que bellas y riquísimas que son!  

Now then, Luna Itzel comes from Mexico and is an interpreter of classic Mexican songs and traditional styles especially the notoriously difficult huapango style (you can look her up at www.lunaitzel.com).  However, in the track I’m going to play for you she sings a lilting waltz.  

This is taken from her fourth album “Frida Volumen 2 - El Venadito” which is dedicated to Mexico’s most celebrated visual artist the great, nay the legendary, Frida Kahlo.   If you’ve never come across the artwork of Frida Kahlo - or indeed her even more unbelievable life story - then I urge you to investigate further.  

In the meantime, the beautiful Luna Itzel is going to ensare us with her voice.  This is called “La Bruja” (The Witch).     

12 “La Bruja” (3:55) by Luna Itzel from album “Frida (Vol 2) - El Venadito” (2008 - Tratore)

[CONTINUOUS]

13 “De Thelo Pia Na Xanarthis” (3:34) by Imam Baildi from album “Imam Baildi” (2007 Emi Greece and 2009 Kukin Music)

[CHANGE CD!!]

You’re listening to WorldBeatUK on Rhubarb Radio with me, Glyn Phillips, taking you on a musical journey around the world from 7pm to 9pm every Wednesday evening.

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The last tune you heard was by the Greek remixers, refixers, producers and bandleaders Imam Baildi.  Formed by two brothers Orestis and Lysandros Falireas in the mid-noughties, they specialised in taking old recordings - especially Greek rembetiko ones - and refixing them with a contemporary aesthetic - new rhythms, style clashes, rap overlays, hip-hop, trip-hop, drum & bass etc.  Not surprising when you realise that their father owned a record label and shop specialising in old rebetiko.  

That track was from their first album called simply “Imam Baildi” which incidentally means the ‘The Fainting Imam’ (or Fainting Priest) and is also the name of a Middle Eastern stuffed aubergine dish!  The track was called “De Thelo Pia Na Zanarthis” and features the vocal talents of Meri Lida (aka Mary Linda) and her husband, Greece’s most famous bazouki-player, singer and composer Manolis Hiotis (aka Manolis Chiotis) - all remixed by the Falireas brothers, Imam Baildi.

Since that first album, the brothers have been inundated with requests to form a live band to tour their remixes and so they’ve put that together and also in the meantime worked on a new album called appropriately enough “Cookbook” (EMI Greece).  They added more strings to their remixing bows by mashing in Balkan and Latin elements to their Greek rebetiko base.  This uptempo Serbian inspired track is called “Ki Allo Hasaposerviko” (which just means ‘yet another hasaposerviko’).


1 (14) “Ki Allo Hasaposerviko” (2:57) by Imam Baildi from album “The Imam Baildi Cookbook” (EMI Greece)

[CONTINUOUS]


2 - Reggae City Ad Jingle (1:05) -

[CONTINUOUS]


3 (15) “Cumbiapunkreggae Party” (4:12) by Goy Karamelo & Los Kangrejos from album “Remedio De Mi Corazon” (Cangrejo Records)

That track was the uplifting and very danceable “Cumbiapunkreggae” from the album “Remedio De Mi Corazon” (Remedy from my Heart) by the Argentinian musician, producer and remixer Goy Karamelo originally from Mendoza, now in Buenos Aires - you can check him out on Soundcloud.  And I loved the little nod to La Colegiala in there too!

And talking of Cumbiapunkreggae Party - that seems like a good time to thank everyone that turned up to the Wagon and Horses in Digbeth last Saturday for Subvert where a slew of great reggae and dub DJs played some fabulous tunes and a packed crowd got into the wonderful dub tunes of Relative - very impressive outfit indeed - with special guests including Bongo Damo also turning up on bongo.   

In particular I’d like to thank all the people who gave my new band Kilombo a rapturous reception on our debut gig.  Relative were not an easy act follow, but we threw ourselves into it - all 9 of us cramped up on the stage and props to Greg for managing to eek some kind of sound from a very difficult situation.  

However, you, the crowd just blew us away as we moved from cumbia to rumba to rhythm and blues and jazz and funk and township, bolero and reggae and each time you just hopped, bopped and skanked along to every tune - even the slow ones.  And then to not let us leave the stage - even though we’d got no more tunes to play!  Too much, guys, too much!  

OK, last week I played you a new tune by the Malian singer Fatoumata Diawara and she’s back this week on the show but as a special guest of the great Beninese vodoun afrobeat band Orchestre Poly-Rhythmo who’ve recently released their first new album in about 20 years called “Cotonou Club” (on the Strut Records label).  Fatoumata joins them on vocals for this tune called “Mariage/Ou C’est Lui” - this one’s for ma petite soeur Virginie lá en Le Havre avec gros bisous:

4 (16) “Mariage/Ou C'est Lui” (5:05) by Orchestre Poly Rythmo from album “Cotonou Club” (Strut Records)

And from their most recent album to their very first album!  This is Orchestre Poly-Rhythmo from 1973.  In an exciting development the record label Analog Africa are launching a new series of albums called “Analog Africa - Limited Dance Edition” dedicated to releasing African and tropical records in strictly limited editions which concentrate on single artists that have had an impact on the label in one way or another.  

The first two releases feature the first LP of Orchestre Poly-Rhythmo simply entitled “Le 1re album” and also a cosmic compilation by the legendary Ghanaian funkster Rob “Roy” Rainsdorf - usually just referred to as Rob.  

Both albums are released on Monday 13th June and I strongly urge you to seek them out.  They come as either CDs (as a sixpage digipack) or as a vinyl LP - both distributed by Proper Records and the vinyl also distributed  by F-Minor.  Don’t forget, these are limited editions - when they gone, they gone!

The first track I’m going to play is by Orchestre Poly-Rhythmo and it’s called “Egni Miton? Nin Mi Na Wa Gbin” (Analog Africa)

5 (17) “Egni Miton? Nin Mi Na Wa Gbin” (6:13) by Orchestre Poly-Rythmo De Cotonou from album “The First Album”

[CONTINUOUS]

6 (18) “Boogie On” (4:15) by Rob "Roy" Raindorf from album “Funky Rob Way”  (Analog Africa)

Yep, you just heard the Ghanian funky afrobeat maestro Rob “Roy” Raindorf and a track called “Boogie On”.  

And that’s exactly what we’re going to do - this is a band I also played last week called Ikebe Shakedown from Brooklyn, New York, who play some really shit-kicking funk, boogaloo and afrobeat!  This track’s from their eponymous album and it’s called “Sakonsa”:  


7 (19) “Sakonsa” (2:32) by Ikebe Shakedown from album “Ikebe Shakedown” (Ubiquity)

Right, anybody wanna dance?  Let’s get this party started!  One of my favourite cumbiamberos Pedro Laza with his Pelayeros and a Mixticius cumbia-swing remix of the track “Cójeme La Caña” . . .


8 (20) “Cójeme La Caña” (3:00) by Pedro Laza Y Sus Pelayeros (Mixticius remix)

Now, didn’t that do you the world of good!?   Certainly did it for me.   This is almost the last track so let’s keep grooving and dancing - in fact as Mixticius has it in this fabulous cumbia crash-up: don’t stop till you get enough!

9 (21) “Don’t Stop Till You Get Enough” (2:55) by Mixticius

That’s the end of the show, boys and girls, hope you enjoyed it.

[Shout-outs, reminders, etc]

I’m going to leave you with a slice of classic world music history - well in my mind at least.  At the beginning of the 90s three different cultures got together to search out common ground together - the young Spanish flamenco group at the head of the nu-flamenco movement, Ketama, the jazz and folk double-bassist with the amazing warm sound, Danny Thompson of Pentangle fame and the as then little-known, in Europe at least, Malian musician Toumani Diabate and his then very unusual african harp, the kora.  

What they created still stands the test of time - two beautiful, life-affirming records Both called Songhai.  Although I love the first album, this is from the second album (“Songhai 2”) and also reunites Ketama with their former vocalist José Soto and includes Keletigui Diabate on the marimba-like balafon.  

This track’s called “Sute Monebo” (which translates as ‘Shouting Won’t Raise the Dead’) and it’s going out to Big Neil and to Dylan and to all those who love great world music.  Good night all and sweet dreams!

10 (22) “Sute Monebo” (4:56) by Ketama, Toumani Diabate & José Soto from album “Songhai 2” (Hannibal Records)

WorldBeatUK (14th Show) - Broadcast Notes (1st June 2011)

Tagged with: WorldBeatUK Glyn Phillips Rory McLeod Owiny Sigoma Fatamouta Diawara Saucejas Dagadana Los de Abajo Ikebe Shakedown Olufemi Vieux Farka Toure Barbad Gil Scott Heron Cedric Brooks Omi Akwaaba Karlon Rootsmamas Babayaga Canelason Pornoson Brownout

 WBUK14 (1/6/11) - PLAYLIST

1 “Intro-Mat” (1:47) by Matchatcha from album ‘Nyekesse (Aimer La Danse)’ (Melodie)

You’re listening to Rhubarb Radio, my name’s Glyn Phillips and welcome to WorldBeatUK - 2 hours of the best world music from around the globe.  Coming up on the show tonight we’ve got music from the USA, France, Spain, Jamaica, Iran, Portugal, Mali, South Africa, Kenya, Mexico, Sweden, Poland, Latvia, Russia and the UK.  So stay tuned to WorldBeatUK as I take you around the world in weighty grooves . . .

Now first off a little plug for a gig that’s happening right here in Birmingham, this Saturday the 4th June - just around the corner from where I’m sitting in the Custard Factory in Digbeth, Birmingham - at the Wagon & Horses, Adderley Street.  I’ve been rehearsing with a new nine-piece band recently called Kilombo and it will be our debut gig.  The band plays a mixture of afro-centric based musics including merengue ska, soca-cumbia, bolero, bossa, rumba, jazz-funk and rhythm & blues and we formed it just for some fun - the chance to play the music we like without having to fit into some kind of marketing label.  

If you fancy coming along, then the night starts at 8, goes on till 3am and will also feature dub band Relative and a fistful of DJs including Skeleton, Marc Reck, the Jam Jah DJs and more.  And it’s all FREE!

For a little taste of what Kilombo play, here’s one of the tunes we’re going to be performing on Saturday.  This is a ska version by the St Petersburg Ska-Jazz Review of the Zimbabwean classic “Skokiaan”:

2 “Skokiaan” (3:23) by St Petersburg Ska-Jazz Review from album “Too Good To Be True” (Megalith Records)

Another plug now, this time for the Celebrating Sanctuary Festival 2011 in London on the 19th June on the South Bank.  As the name suggests it refers to raising awareness of the plight of refugees during Refugee Week (which takes place 20th -26th June).  I’ll be featuring some of the artists involved in the Festival over the next couple of weeks or so on this show and first up is the UK’s Rory McLeod.  

He carries with him that same mixture of idiosyncracy and integrity as people like Ash Mandrake, Roy Harper etc.  I think it’s safe to say that Rory is an underground legend.  Described variously as an amazing folk artist, traveller, troubadour extraordinaire and a one-man folk orchestra, Rory plays a multitude of instruments including trombone, harmonica, spoons, djembe, bandorea, guitar, finger-cymbals and tapshoe-driven stomp-box!  He’s played and recorded with people like Ani Di Franco, Taj Mahal, Kathryn Tickell and Ali Farka Toure amongst many others.

I had the pleasure of performing with him back in the 90s right here in Birmingham - a great musician, and a true gent to boot.  Luckily for us here in Brum he’s come down from the Orkneys and will be performing next month at the Kitchen Garden Café, Kings Heath, courtesy of World Unlimited.  I urge you to go along - you will be drawn into his unique world and emerge with your senses buzzing.  And talking of buzzing - this is Rory McLeod and a track from his new album (“Swings and Roundabouts”) called “Lassooing the Bees”!

3 “Lassooing the Bees” (4:00) by Rory McLeod from the album “Swings and Roundabouts” (Talkative Music - Talk004)

Wasn’t that fun!  OK yet another plug now!  Over the last few weeks I’ve been playing material from the debut album of an anglo-kenyan band called Owiny Sigoma.  They are having their inaugural concert on Monday June 6th at Café OTO in Dalston, London.  So here’s a track from their album - also called Owiny Sigoma, on Gilles Peterson’s Brownswood Recordings label - this is a tune sung in English called “Here On The Line”.

4 “Here On the Line” (4:12) by Owiny Sigoma Band from album ‘Owiny Sigoma Band’ (Brownswood Recordings)
                                                         
Meanwhile over in West Africa we come across the Cote D’Ivoire born, Mali raised singer Fatoumata Diawara (who I first came across last year singing backing vocals on the AfroCubism CD).  Fatoumata will be playing the support slot for AfroCubism at their Royal Albert Hall concert on 27th June this year, but in the meantime here’s a preview from her forthcoming album (“Fatou”) to be released by World Circuit in September.  This track is called “Kanou” and it’s just been released as an EP on digital download (check iTunes, Amazon, etc).

5 “Kanou” (3:56) by Fatoumata Diawara from EP ‘Kanou’ (World Circuit)

Ok let’s leave Africa for a while, and travel far to the North of Europe to the Baltic Sea for the next few numbers.  First up is a choir called Saucejas from the small country of Latvia sandwiched between Lithuania and Estonia.  They specialise in choral folk music and this tune is called “Nekukoji, Dzeguzite” which translates as ‘Stop calling, Cuckoo’.

6 “Nekukoji, Dzeguzite” (Stop Calling, Cuckoo) (2:50) by Saucejas from album ‘Native Music 5 - Latvia’ (Latvian Music Information Centre)
 
Just down from Latvia and Lithuania is Poland where you can find the young folk-pop trio Dagadana (formed by Dagmara Gregorowicz and Dana Vynnytska).  A few months ago I featured them in an article that I wrote for WorldMusic.co.uk on the state of Polish world music after hearing their album “Malenka” (Offside Records 005) which was awarded the Polish Fryderyk Award for Folk/World Album of the Year 2010.  

They’ve just contacted me to tell me about their forthcoming album “Dlaczego Nie” (which translates as “Why Not?”) and to share the first single from the album : “Wszystkie Maja Po Chlopoku” (Every girl has a man) which is their innovative and very jazzy take on a folk song sung to them by their mothers when they were just kids.  The album won’t be released until Autumn, but here’s a taste of what they do.

7 “Wszystkie” (Every Girl Has a Man) (4:13) by Dagadana from album ‘Dlaczego Nie (Why Not?)’

Meanwhile on the other side of the Baltic Sea lies Sweden.  This next band is a trio formed by Pelle Björnlert on Fiddle, Johan Hedin on Swedish nyckelharpa and Eric Pekkari on zither, two-accordion and fiddle. They tend to specialise in very old Swedish folk music and this is no exception.  This tune is called “Flageolettpolska”.

8 “Flageolettpolskan” (2:58) by Pelle Björnlert, Johan Hedin & Erik Pekkari

Staying in Sweden but with a far more contemporary approach to folk is the duo Jonas Knutsson and Johan Norberg.  In fact it’s almost folk-jazz, especially because for this album they’re joined by the wonderful German double bassist Eva Kruse who contributes this piece of Bavarian folk to their repertoire. This is called "Schwarzer Bua”.

9 “Schwarzer Bua” (3:15) by Jonas Knutsson & Johan Norberg from album ‘Skaren: Norrland III’ (Act)

OK, enough Nordic intensity for the moment - let’s have some fun.  Everybody aboard the long-haul flight to Mexico City for the next one - Mexico’s ska-punk rebels Los de Abajo (Those From Below) and a rather groovy track full of swagger and street attitude called, naturally enough, “Actitud Calle”:

10 “Actitud Calle” (4:59) by Los De Abajo from the album “Actitud Calle” (Wrasse Records)

And from one great New World metropolis to another, New York!  But maybe not as you expect.  Most people associate afrobeat with West Africa - especially Nigeria and Ghana, but this next band are from the Big Apple itself and mix very, very convincing afro-beat with afro-funk, cinematic soul, deep disco and boogaloo that features a mighty horn section anchored by tight deep-pocketed grooves.  The band - from Brooklyn - is called Ikebe Shakedown, the album is also called “Ikebe Shakedown”, it’s on the Ubiquity record label and this track is called “Asa-Sa”:

11 “Asa-Sa” (5:06) by Ikebe Shakedown from album ‘Ikebe Shakedown’ (Ubiquity)

[CONTINUOUS - CONTINUOUS]

12 “Ori Mi” (5:03) by Olufemi from album ‘Just In Newtown’

[ - Change CD! - Change CD! - ]

The last track was by the South African based, Nigerian saxophonist and composer, Olufemi from his debut album “Just in Newtown” and a track called “Ori Mi”.

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Now, there can’t be many world music fans who haven’t heard of Ali Farka Toure the Malian guitar maestro who was very much responsible for the initial successes of British record label World Circuit.  Ali died 7 years ago, however, in that time his son Vieux Farka Toure has gradually emerged from the giant shadow of his father to become a respected musician in his own right.  

Last year he performed to a television audience of a billion people in Johannesburg, South Africa during the World Cup.  Vieux will be performing in the UK next month - 16th July at the Larmer Tree Festival and 30th July at Womad in Charlton Park.

Vieux has a new album out next month on the 4th July on the Six Degrees record label.  It’s produced by Soulive’s Eric Krasno and features contributions from Derek Trucks of the Allman Brothers, John Scofield and Dave Matthews.  The album is called “The Secret” and I have a preview of one of the songs right here for you.  This track features Derek Trucks and is called “Aigna”:

(1) 13 “Aigna” (Feat. Derek Trucks) (4:53) by Vieux Farka Touré from album ‘The Secret’ (Six Degrees)

[CONTINUOUS - CONTINUOUS]

(2) 14 “Duet Flamenco” (2:13) by Vahid Hajikamali from album ‘Duet Flamenco’ (Barbad Records)

You just heard a track called “Duet Flamenco” from an album of the same name from - of all places - Iran!  I have next to no details apart from the name Vahid Haji-kamali and that it was released by Iran’s Barbad Records sometime between 2007 and 2009.  But I like it! 

Also from my same Persian sampler is the following excerpt, originally from a soundtrack album for the box-office breaking Iranian film “M for Mother”, the music for which was composed by Arya Aziminejad who has worked with people like Peter Gabriel and Jocelyn Pook.  This is called “As Time Goes By”:

(3) 15 “As Time Goes By” (1:43) by Arya Aziminejad from album ‘M For Mother’  (Barbad Records)

So beautiful and wistful and sad!   

And here’s some sad news.  It is with a profound sense of loss that I have to report the death on Saturday last of the great poet and singer Gil Scott Heron.  He died at the age of 62 after returning from Europe from a virus, I think, that he picked up over here.  A young age to die, but a man who in his years did as much as any and more than many to raise the consciousness of all those that came across his music and message. 

 A man of deep thought and incisive observation, Gil crafted magnificent opuses of life-changing and life-affirming positivity which he often set against minimal percussion and backing.  The internet has been awash since Saturday when the news broke of his death with people of all ages and backgrounds testifying to the effect that Gil had on their lives, me amongst them.  

The teacher is dead, but his lesson goes on.  For a world music show like this, what other song than his reggae-based homage to the power of music and word; from the 1983 album “Reflections”, this is “Storm Music”:

(4) 16 “Storm Music” (4:59) by Gil Scott-Heron from album ‘Reflections’ (Sony)

[CONTINUOUS - CONTINUOUS]

(5) - Reggae City Ad Jingle (1:05)

[CONTINUOUS - CONTINUOUS]

(6) 17 “Mun-Dun-Gu” (3:16) by Cedric Brooks (Bamboo)

That last majestic track was “Mundungu” by the Jamaican saxophonist and flautist Cedric Brooks famous for his work with The Skatalites, The Light of Saba and - of course Count Ossie’s rasta outfit the Mystic Revelation of Rastafari.  Cedric recorded that track under the moniker Sound Dimension - and it’s a killer!  “Mundungu”!

If you like that track, then you can hear it played live by my new band, El Combo Kilombo, which - as I mentioned at the top of the show - is playing its debut gig at the Wagon & Horses, right here on Adderley Street, Digbeth in Birmingham this Saturday 4th June.  

Kilombo play a mixture of musics from afrocentric bases including soca-cumbia, merengue-ska, nyabinghi-reggae, Township-jazz, bolero, rumba, bossa, jazz-funk and rhythm & blues.  

It’s a free event starting at 8pm and going on till about 3am; it’s called Subvert and besides Combo Kilombo there’s the live dub band “Relative” and DJs including Rhubarb’s very own DJ Marc Reck, as well as Skeleton the Jam Jah DJs Robin Giorno and Bongo Damo as well as Christy, Dodgy Greg and Stalingrad - so there’ll be plenty of Reggae and Dub magic to keep you happy - and it’s all FREE!  Yep not a penny on the door!

Ok, let’s go to Jamaica and to a new artist - to me at any rate.  This is Omi who’s just been signed to Clifton Dillon’s Shang Records label and a love song called “Cheerleader”: 

(7) 18 “Cheerleader” (2:56) Omi (Shang Records)

Now, the Akwaaba record label have been very active recently and one of their recent projects was to celebrate last week’s Africa Day which took place on the 25th of May.  They decided to release an EP called “Mama Africana” in homage to one of the most emblematic figures of Africa - the Woman, the mother with her baby on the back carrying and selling goods, bringing food to the table at the end of the day.  

Mpula from the band Batida took a hook from a classic 1960s Angolan Semba “There Goes Maria” and then challenged some of his favourite MCs to build a poem around this concept.  The three versions selected are on the EP.  

Here’s the contribution of Portuguese afro-rapper Karlon (aka Kota K) who talks about the generosity of the women in his life and his neighbourhood, mostly immigrants from Cape Verde.  

This is “Lá Vai Maria” - There Goes Maria:

(8) 19 “Lá Vai María” feat. Karlon (3:36) by Batida from EP ‘Mamã Africana’ (Akwaaba)

Here’s an interesting cumbia refixed by Goy Karamelo; originally by the Barcelonian duo of Susana Abellán and Diana Feria - better known as the Rootsmamas, whose philosophy is “Life is simple, all is love, enjoy in peace”.  And you can’t say fairer than that!  This is “La Trampa”

(9) 20 “La Trampa” (4:04) by Rootsmamas (Goy Karamelo refix)

A nice bit of cumbia-pop there. And now some Balko-Klezmer fusion from Clermont Ferrand - this is a track called “Yvan Oreille D’Ours” by the French band Babayaga:

(10) 21 “Yvan Oreille D’Ours” (3:22) by Babayaga from “1er Album” 

Staying with the French connection this is a track by the French latin-hip-hop band Canelason from their album “Sin Pasaporte” (without passport) and a track featuring Racko, called “La Rumba”.  Let’s see if this gets you in the mood for moving . . .

(11) 22 “La Rumba” (Featuring Racko) (3:31) by Canelason from album ‘Sin Pasaporte’ 

OK, almost at the end of the show.  And appropriately enough - since this is going to be the XXX rated part . . .  'What’s he going on about?' I can hear you thinking.  

Well this next band are from New York and started out as a salsa and timba band led by the Cuban bassist and timbero Danny Rojo; however after a few years of playing standard fare, Danny started changing the lyrics of their tunes in the heat of the moment whilst doing gigs and, shall we say, ‘spicing’ up the words and commenting on the dancers in front of him.  His new lyrics really added to the sexually charged atmosphere on the dancefloor and went down well with their fans.  

From that moment they’ve never looked back and so they changed their name to Pornoson.  Yep, that’s what I said, Pornoson.  Just be careful when you’re googling it - you might get more than you bargained for… missus!  Their stage show apparently makes Cuban timba legends, La Charanga Habanera look like choirboys - which makes the mind boggle, since I saw La Charanga Habanera on a couple of occasions in the 90s and can attest to their effect on the libido!  

For those of a delicate disposition, fear not - it’s all in Spanish - so you’re safe (or deprived, judging on how you see it!) unless you’re a Spanish speaker in which case: disfruta a las delicias de la salsa pornografica!  However, the music - which they describe as afro-cuban funk rock -  is good quality whatever your attitude to the lyrics including people like Eddie Venegas on trombone and violin, Batanga on tres and electric guitars and the great Luisito Quintero on drums and percussion.  So here you go, great music, raunchy lyrics - this is Danny Rojo y su Pornoson and “Nena La Playera”.  Enjoy!

(12) 23 “Nena La Playera” (5:50) by Pornoson from album “Ah Sing Are” (Dan Red Music)

OK, that’s it for this week.  Thanks . . . 

(Shoutouts, don’t forget Kilombo at Wagon & Horses this Saturday, etc)

I’m going to leave you now with a wonderful bit of descarga workout from Texan latin funksters Brownout - this track is “Homenaje” from the album of the same name.  Trust me, this is some serious groove.  Good night!

(13) 24 “Homenaje” (3:28) by Brownout from abum "Homenaje" (Freestyle Records)

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